Alternative Lifestyles

holding-hands5416721 If you’re a teacher living a life style whch is anything except the usual ‘married with children’, this blog may be for you. Single parents, Gay and Lesbian teachers, and teachers with a non-teaching dependent may experience unique opportunities or terrible hardships in finding jobs and settling into a new overseas life.

Alternative Lifestyles Overseas provides a place where International Teachers living alternative lifestyles can ask questions, share experiences, support, tips and advice on landing a job.

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59 Responses to Alternative Lifestyles

  1. chalo1972 says:

    I am an experienced music teacher. I am gay and I have a non-teaching partner. What are my possibilities to get hired in one of your schools?

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  2. Rhaegar Targaryen says:

    What does anyone have to say about working at an American International School that is also a Catholic school? The country has legalized gay marriage and has anti-discrimination laws to protect homosexuals. Would it still be OK for a gay tacher (with a non-teaching, host country national partner) to work in such a school? Would the country’s laws protect a gay teacher in such a school? The Catholic-International-American School is also an IB World School.

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  3. frankie5j says:

    I’ve considering applying to teach in Italy, I’m in a same sex relationship and my partner is a non teacher. She has the right to work in Europe but doesn’t speak the language fluently although keen to work. Does anyone have advice about how to manage/support partners who wont have the school structure to immediately meet people?

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  4. Knowledge is power says:

    Can I say something as a trailing spouse heterosexual father, who cares whether your gay???,really !!! Well guess what a lot of ignorant schools,parents ,colleagues do. My old man says we all s**t the same way. Heterosexual,homosexual,bisexual,lesbian who cares.My concern is how good you are with my children,its that simple.
    All that said,be very very aware of local laws and be very very careful. Keep safe and enjoy life.
    I agree about the alcoholism,drug use and where the use of local people are concerned in relationships.
    International is not another planet be very very careful.

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  5. Just me says:

    The ISS Fair or Search is usually the best option

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  6. Juno says:

    Hello,

    I am a single mom with a four-year moving to Shanghai next month to teach, The school knew about my son upfront as it was on my CIS file, but the question I have concerns schools. If any of you have taught there, can you recommend a good pre-school? My son is still too young for the free tuition package at my school. SAS and Concordia both have long waiting lists and I don’t want to send him to a “for-profit” school with huge numbers. The cost of many of the schools also seems to be outrageously high — $20,000 USD a year is standard. Is this the norm is other major cities worldwide?

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  7. Bette & Tina says:

    For me, how you present yourself to a prospective employer is a matter of personal integrity and honesty. (As well, presenting yourself as a team will help to advance other gay/lesbian couple’s situations/visibility around the world!)

    As part of a lesbian couple teaching internationally we have taught in two international schools as a team. Both times, in the interviews our directors have asked about our relationship. While it felt strange to discuss my sexuality with my future boss, it’s also very reassuring to be open and honest. In both cases, our directors explained how the community would be supportive, as well as mentioning some of the cultural differences and difficulties we might face in our new homes.

    At job fairs we have received a variety of responses as a couple. Most people do not walk up to prospective employers and say, “I’m gay, here’s my partner, will you hire us?” Unfortunately, that’s more or less what we have had to do. We have never been dishonest or tried to hide who we are under the pretenses of being “sisters” or “cousins”. Some of the responses include, “Ohhhh! You’re partners! And you’re applying as a couple…Oh! Very interesting.” (We didn’t hear back.) On the other hand, we also have had many successful interviews in which our relationship was NOT a factor.

    While searching for jobs, we have felt the unspoken bias. At times it’s not clear whether it’s you, your personality or your sexuality that plays a role in the decision process.

    My advice to all couples is to be honest and open about who you are and make sure the school/director’s philosophy match with who you are. Some people will not want to hire you because you are gay….but do you really want to work for someone who wouldn’t hire you if you were out to them?

    While I am not running up and down the street with my rainbow flag, I shirk at the idea of hiding the person I truly am from the people I work closest with.

    Clearly, if your employer forces you back into the closet, you will be constantly having to hide your relationship. You will make yourself miserable, living and working in place that you can’t be the real you.

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    • help with applications please says:

      Bette & Tina,
      Could you please give us an idea of which fairs you attended. We as a same-sex couple had no luck at AASSA fair in the states late last year. We are considering whether to go to Bangkok or London during the next recruiting season. We also have 2 children which could complicate things a little. Looking for any help or suggestions, even which areas to avoid. We are currently in Asia and feel that it seems to be the least conservative in their hiring. Would love to hear from you again. Thanks.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Couldn’t agree more with all of it. Wonder how much has changed in the past few years since this post.

      In our last search, Taiwan has been surprisingly completely unconcerned (like — not blinking; I almost wonder if I’ve been heard correctly).

      Elsewhere, much less pleasant. Offer recinded in Qutar, another offer much compromised in Shanghai.

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  8. John says:

    I am so frustrated and even depressed, but I know I can cope if I need to. I am in my 60’s and in a school where all the teachers live on campus. All the teachers are mostly young (at least 20 years younger than I am) and married. We are expected to do most everything together.

    My partner is in antther country working. While we Skype each other daily, I am beginning to realize that life is so short. I want to spend all my time with him. We are family, and even though it really would only involve being away from him 6 more months, that seems like such a long time.

    They say you should not “burn bridges”. I’ve already soured my relations with the administration here with my desire to leave. However, although I am not wealthy, I have the assets to live comfortably the rest of my life with my partner. There is also a clause in the contract that allows a couple months notice, and the teacher can depart at any time.

    Have any of you had an experience like this or do you know of anyone who has? I’d like to know how to proceed. I suppose I could stay in this uncomfortable position and try to converse with people I have no similar interests with. I can do it, but as mentioned, should I? I’m obviously not happy here.

    John

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  9. gay couple says:

    International School Bangkok readily accepts gay teaching couples and same-sex “trailing spouse” types. There are several openly gay couples working here (including in the admin department), and the upper admin is working with the school board to try and get benefits for same-sex couples–this is an initiative they believe in. It is a very open and accommodating place, which only adds to the over all prestige of the school, which offers an excellent package and strives to be the best of the best world wide. The head of school, Dr. Bill Gertiz, is a wonderful man. Gay, straight, or whatever, you’re truly blessed and fortunate to work here. For those of us who love Thailand, it’s hard to imagine a better place to be. I love being here, and I can’t image ever leaving. It took me almost 10 years overseas, and more than a little good fortune to get here, but if you’re a long term expat type, a school like ISBangkok is the place to be.

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    • gay couple says:

      Just as a follow up. ISBangkok now offers full benefits to same-sex couples, including non-teaching spouses. We’re all just part of the rich mix that defines our species: human. I hope more and more schools follow the lead.

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  10. JustMoved says:

    If you apply to an IB School and you get asked awkward questions, you might like to mention the IB Learner Profile, which the IB schools have to promote. Among other things IB learners are supposed to be open-minded and caring.
    I am a married woman who has moved with a dependent husband and 2 dependent children to international schools in various countries and I would say it is best to be upfront about the situation with dependents, otherwise you might find they are not included in the benefits package. There were schools/countries that refused to even consider me, no matter how great a teacher I was, simply because of my family situation (though I’m sure married men with dependent wives were treated differently by these schools!) – for example Middle Eastern countries. Just keep positive and tell yourself you wouldn’t want to work in those places with those attitudes anyway! Other schools would not cover both my children for tuition as I was a single earner. However it is worth persisting, as I have worked in 3 “top” international schools and my dependents have been accepted and covered by benefits – but you do have to look long and hard for such schools and my experience of going to job fairs was not really positive – in fact for my present job I didn’t go to a fair at all, I just applied directly to the schools I was interested in. I also tacked the situation head on at interviews by mentioning my family and asking “Is it a problem to you that I have dependents?”
    As far as same sex couples go – there are schools who will hire if both are teaching, but will not give “dependent” status if only one is working, claiming things like “homosexuality is illegal in this country” or “registered partnerships are not accepted in this country for the purposes of immigration/visas” etc.
    My advice would be: be open minded about where you want to go – don’t just set your heart on South America. There are great schools out there that will employ you both and give a place to your children, but they might not necessarily be in S. America.
    (BTW I do know of a school in Chile that hired 2 men in a same sex relationship, so there are schools in S. America that will do this.)

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    • Alba says:

      Dear JustMoved,
      I am a single (divorced) parent with two school aged children. I worked in two overseas schools about 12 years ago, before I had children. I have 19 years of teaching experience (U.S. public, college, and overseas), advanced degrees, excellent references, a positive attitude, in a nutshell an excellent candidate. I told all the directors I met at the last job fair that I had two dependents right away, and nobody wanted to take the time to interview me, but I still think it is best to be up front about it. It is not about my personal life. It’s about the contract that school needs to give me. So, it’s best to not have any surprises. Unfortunately, economics plays a big part in the hiring process. I know I was more qualified than most at the last job fair, but I will cost a school more. Anyway, I am not giving up yet!! If anyone knows of any schools that value candidates who want to put roots down at the school, be an active participant, and bring two intelligent well rounded students with them. Please let me know. I really want to return to Latin America.

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  11. Pierre1 says:

    Don’t work in the Middle East if you wish to come out; just stay firmly in the cupboard and be very discreet. Neither can you co-habit with a partner if unmarried (so if you really want to work there get married before you travel and have your marriage certificate handy if you go to some more remote hotels; same name on passport does not always mean you are accepted as married to that person. Married friends had to stay in separate rooms in different parts of a hotel on a Gulf island!), and single parenthood is illegal unless you have divorce papers.

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  12. querida says:

    When we went to the Iowa UNI international job fair we had recently been married in one of the only states with legal gay-marriage in America. We naively thought that it would be “no problem” so we were very open about our relationship – we too have the same last name – and don’t bear a resemblance to one another.

    We lucked out that first contract and were hired as a married couple in Turkey. One of us used a first name at school and the senior partner used our last name because even though they were “cool” about it – they didn’t really need two
    Miss Swinehearts – a little over the top – too obvious.

    Since then, however, we have not fared so well. Only one other school agreed to interview us as a couple during our second round of job search. In the intervening years we usually have to apply as singles and find jobs in nearby countries. Everywhere we go we meet openly gay people working – even in the middle east – we do not meet openly gay or lesbian partnered couples.

    We have met a couple of closeted couples and everyone seems to cope and think the sacrifice is worth the chance to see the world and experience the cultures.

    Regarding the children and the questions that are asked which are nobody’s business – just be up front and honest. One woman accepted the job and after she got here decided to bring her 7 year old from the States. But the child had not been included in the initial contract…. Other teachers are here with one or two children and all of their paperwork (visa, residencies, return trips etc) and tuition is covered by the school because they are part of the contract.

    It is like being on a new brave frontier of sorts. One of us is openly gay with people at work and in the school provided housing – but the other is in a very conservative school which requires complete discretion, even if some people know it remains a “secret”.

    I know a director who said he hired a lesbian couple and then told the other staff that they are sisters. Apparently they go along with this and they don’t have any children with them.

    In closing, I wish I could offer you a more positive story of the chances for gays and lesbians in international schools but I am afraid they lag behind the general liberal leaning westernized countries. Still I would say, give it a go, give it a shot- see what the reaction is the first half a dozen times – and then decide how to market yourselves for the best possible chance at a successful overseas
    experience. Good Luck!

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  13. For the love of Education says:

    As an educator and administrator I urge the International Schools around the world to open their doors to alternative lifestyle educators. Does a persons lifestyle effect the ability to be a good educator? No, is my answer. I have found that many schools around the world will not consider same sex couple’s or single gay/lesbian educators. However, at the same time they will hire single straight men and women and then turn their heads when these teachers have sexual relationships with other co-workers and even live together in school provided housing. I have heard the old story so much from schools, that we can’t hire gay people because of the message we will sending to our students of immortally, but at the same time these schools will allow adultery or common law practices to teachers that are in this business for travel and not the true desire to educate the children of the world to become better citizens.

    Yes it is time we open our minds, and stop this bias mind set, and really think about education and not personal points of view. You will find most gay educators are compassionate, caring and dedicate professionals. What a shame being different in this world can cost you your life and your career.

    International schools if you want to make a change in this world let it start in your classrooms.

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    • help with applications please says:

      Thank you For the Love of Education. We need more educators and administrators like you out there. I hope we get the pleasure of interviewing with you at a job fair this recruiting season! Please tell us what continent/country you are at. Thanks again.

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  14. isrlover says:

    A real catch 22 situation for us who are gay. It is my believe as a gay man, married legally to my partner, that my sexuality has nothing to do with the delivery of a great teaching service to my school. At times when you are honest about it, you could be victimised, especially if you work in a country like Kuwait or Saudi Arabia. One should be very careful disclosing information about your sexuallity. Do hetrosexuals disclose their status during interviews? No!!!!They don’t. I was in the Middle East when I decided to go home to get married. When I returned, everyone knew about it as one of my friends could not control her tongue. Currently everything seems ok, with many of the staff members inquiring about my partner’s welfare……hey…..but when they want to get rid of us, they will use this against us. Time to move on again. lol

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  15. Dina says:

    I had a question about having a non-teaching spouse. I’ve applied a few places and when they found out I was married they were only interested if he could teach too, and subsequently I lost the offers. I’m trying to think what is the best approach here. I want to be forthcoming but I also don’t want them to make it more than it is, and not get hired because of it. (I realize of course that a school would have to help me with visas, and my husband as well.)

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    • Don says:

      I have a non-“licensed” spouse. I met her on vacation and went and got her at the break and brought her back with me. (We weren’t even married for another five years.) She volunteered in the library, went in everyday and worked for free, and was then offered a job for the next year as assistant to the librarian. In the meantime she got a TESOL certificate online from a reputable company and was given a full-time position (made just for her) working in small groups with primary kids who were struggling with English – “pull-outs.” We’ve since been hired at two other schools – we met years ago – and worked as a full-time assistant in primary at one of them. In her current position she does 25 hours a week using her TESOL at the school working in the lower primary grades doing “pull-outs,” a position the school made for her based on the good references she got for her program at the first school. But she’s always been paid as a local hire. She never encumbered me in getting a pósition, but I was upfront about her and our dog in all the letteers of intros and sign-ups at thee fairs. That TESOL really does come in handy. With it the school can justify a position for her (or your husband if he’s interested in working). She goes to all the PD days, in-services, has learned a lot about education, and she’s turned out to be a damned good teacher and the school sees that, license or not.

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    • craftyteacher says:

      I also have a non-teaching husband. He’s 10 years older than me and semi-retired. I’ll admit I was surprised when I was offered a job that included all benefits for my non-working spouse. I’m in Turkey and have been very pleased with our treatment. Keep looking.

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      • Dina says:

        Thank you Don and craftyteacher. I’ll keep looking, and also see what options work for my husband, since he has done some teaching before (just not at an international school)

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      • edoboy says:

        Craftyteacher, would you be prepared to share a few more details with me by email as research support for a personnel policy change I am working on at our school? I’d like to have some examples of schools where partners have been granted the same benefits as straight couples.

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  16. llt says:

    I have worked as a single mom in overseas schools since my son was a baby (he graduated from an International school and is now in university)and I would definitely agree that you MUST be totally up front about having kids. I am now in administration and agree with Don in that, if you waited until after i offered you a job, to tell me about your children it would send up a HUGE red flag! However, letting interviewers know that you are gay, I think, is a totally personal choice which depends on how comfortable you are with it. I also think that some schools will take that into consideration when hiring so it may limit the places where you can go. I have many good friends in the international circuit who are gay, and some are completely honest about it and some are more discreet, only letting their good friends know. Both of these approaches work because it is each individual’s personal choice in doing what they are comfortable with.

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    • help with applications please says:

      The issue is that we both have the same last names and therefore we can’t pretend that we are not together. It will be way too obvious so we feel that we have no real option. The only way we could do it is if we applied using our maiden names but then when it came time for visa applications etc, both our passports have the same name. It’s very tricky and feels quite overwhelming to us. We just want schools to look at us fairly and to not have any preconceptions about us. However we are aware that school charters, countries and their laws etc make it somewhat more complicated. We are both outstanding educators with 25 years experience between us and of course realise that there will be countries that wont be able to look at us. We are just looking for a meritocracy.

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      • Don says:

        I worked with a lesbian couple in Pakistan. They were up front and hired into an American school, shared their housing, and though everyone knew they were a couple, no one, not even the Pakistani staff, cared one way or the other. To the school’s credit they brought them into an ultra-conservative culture and the ladies were respected teachers and, as far as I know – they were friends of mine – had no problems on or off campus. You know education administrators and teachers are generally very liberal. It’s not like you’re joining the Marines or applying for Missionary work.

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  17. Carla says:

    I agree with those that advise you to be up front about all things as far as your dependents. I am a single mom with two children. I wanted to see if I could get a job internationally on my own after my divorce, happily I have been able to do just that. I work in the UAE. I am in administration so that position might allow more dependents. Nonetheless, single with one child and having a ‘friend’ whom is also an educator with a child and you being willing to share housing may actually be a trump card. Best wishes to you!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Always be honest and upfront. If it’s going to be a problem (being Gay or being a single parent family), then you probably don’t want to be there.

      Like

  18. Amy says:

    I’m a lesbian and I am only out to people who I have developed friendships with outside of work.

    As far as applying as a couple, my single friends and I have talked about applying as a teaching couple since being single can put us at a disadvantage. I think once the fairs get here, if two of us have a distinct interest in a similar school that preferred to hire couples, we would probably apply as a couple even though we weren’t romantically involved.

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  19. Jay says:

    I have been teaching overseas now for about 10 years. I’ve had a son for about half that time. As far as I know…..I’ve never not be hired for having a son although. I’ll never told a director upfront that I’m bi because my experience has been that that is something that some will take into consideration when they hire. Once I’ve arrived at a school….I’ve gotten to know other teachers and then I’ve come out to my friends. For me it is similar to being in the States…it shouldn’t matter but it does to some. Just use your best judgment and you will enjoy the expat life.

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  20. windscape says:

    Hi I am teaching overseas, and am divorced with a child, yet I am actually still learning from reading this. I did not disclose that I had a child until there was some level of interest toward me from this school. This was not strategic in any way, just kind of ‘why bother if they wouldn’t hire me anyway?’

    Coming from the US where employers can’t ask anything personal about you I was taken aback to be asked my age. I have seen couples with three chidren move and teach at several schools,letting their children grow up in 5 or 6 different countries, so I don’t think my one will be a problem. Most schools will take couples with two, so I figure single with one is not a problem.

    However, I know a single teacher with three children, and I know of a school in the UAE which said if I was married I could bring 13, but single, I would pay half my rent and half my child’s tuition.

    There are gay and lesbian teachers everywhere I have been. In my mind that should be much less of an issue than the alcoholism I sometimes see among expats. However, it probably is not. But just as I know no heterosexuals running around displaying their sexuality at work, I see no homo or bisexuals doing this either, so it should be no one’s business.

    I agree with Kat and Don cobined. I would say you have two kids, are very good friends sharing the responsibility of raising the kids, and will share a house to make things easier on the school and yourselves.

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    • BeHonest says:

      I think saying you are ‘good friends’ insults their intelligence. You can be who you are and be honest about who you are in a professional classy way. You don’t have to march in with a rainbow flag and scare them away thinking you’re going to parade and be pushy; but I wouldn’t hide it or try to say otherwise either. Treat it as a non-issue because it is. The issue is whether you are excellent teachers and people who can help their school be better.

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  21. Don says:

    Kat, how successful have you been not being forthcoming about having a child when the school is paying for your housing, travel, shipping, and that your child may be a student at the school? If I were an administrator I’d be concerned about you not being upfront with ANY pertinent information right off the bat. Red Flag. I have a small dog, and I make it clear even before the interview that I have a dog I will not separate with, and if the school’s housing doesn’t allow dogs opr the school wouldn’t consider me because of it, we’d both be wasting our time with an interview.

    My advicee is be upfront and honest. I taught at an American school in Pakistan that brought over a gay couple who got on just fine in the school community and with the national staff – no secrets – and in Pakistan of all places. Just be up front.

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  22. Peter says:

    Hey,

    I live in Quito. Been overseas for over 12 years…from the Middle East to South America. Sure, there are sensitivities that one, if they wish to embark on the expat lifestyle, must endure. Alternative lifestyles i.e, LGTBS, whatever, I have known, been friends with many differing lifestyles persons…in fact, some quite open and OOTC…most schools will accept you, if you are a great teacher and, like any “personal life style,” MYOB…be professional when professional and be personal when personal…know the difference…I have not heard of one teacher being mistreated or fired because of “who” they are…in this context that is!

    Not informing a Director of your child from the get go is not a good move…be honest. Sure, the Director may not want a single, with a dependent, but better to know that from the get go rather than hide your dependent needs…comes across as unethical and gives the rest of “us” a bad rap. Most overseas hires will be upfront about who they are…a good match serves the needs of ALL in the recruiting process i.e, school, students, parents, teachers, admin, ALL of us…and yourself because you’ll be happier.

    Enjoy!

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Peter. I’ve been living in Quito with my partner for three years I’m wondering whether there might be interest in forming a group of local LGBT teachers here in Quito. My partner and I are interested in socializing and a support network but don’t go to the bars etc. What do you think?

      Like

    • Bill says:

      Peter, didn’t intend to remain anonymous — just missed the boxes at the top.

      Like

  23. katt says:

    p.s. i don’t even mention that i have a kid until i’m offered a contract, unless it happens to come up in the interview. i don’t think your personal situation should have any bearing on your ability to do the job well and i find that most schools are looking for awesome teachers, and are willing to incorporate your personal needs once they have decided to hire you based on your professional awesomeness.

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    • d says:

      Wrong advice.
      Obviously you need to tell a school you have kids and need tuition and extra benefits. Not all schools offer these benefits.

      Like

      • Anonymous says:

        I agree with the reply above. Completely wrong advice. You need to be upfront with a school about your family situation. Finance is an important factor for a school. They need to know what they can offer you and your child, including airfares, tuition, medical insurance, etc. or if they offer anything at all. Additionally, you need to know if there is space for your child in school. Some schools are full at certainly grade levels and would not bend for a faculty child.

        I have been overseas for the past 13 years. I’ve always been open about my sexuality and have never been discriminated against. I moved into administration seven years ago. For the past two jobs, I’ve been completely open, at one school in Europe and now in Asia, even with a trailing partner. There are schools out there who will accept us for who we are. You just have to look hard and be patient.

        Having said that, I would count myself as one of the lucky ones out there in the international school circuit. Good luck.

        Like

  24. katt says:

    i would say apply at any school you want, as ‘friends’. i’m a single mom and i’ve taught in china, egypt, greece, and south america. no, being gay isn’t accepted in these places, and most international schools will shy away from you, if they know your situation, but i’ve worked with and met lots of gays who were quiet about it except in the appropriate places (eg among friends) and that seemed to work for them. you’ll probably find that most international schools are happy to get a ‘two fer’, i.e. two teachers applying together, especially if one is a secondary specialist and the other is an elementary generalist. they love that. that’s why it’s so easy for husband-and-wife teams to get hired. plus they tend to recognise that it’s easier to move overseas if you have your social support network with you!

    many schools will provide free tuition for one child of a teacher, so if there’s any way you could present yourselves as two single moms with one kid each that would probably work out best for you financially. also, most schools tend to be pretty flexible about housing arrangements etc once you’re hired, so i’d focus mostly on your professional aspects and not discuss personal aspects much until after being offered contracts.

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    • L says:

      hi katt,
      i am a single mom to a 2 year old and i looking to teach overseas next year. i see you have been hired in four countries. would you mind sharing the names of your schools and if the package they offered allowed you to save some money.

      thanks!
      lighow@gmail.com

      Like

  25. OSMarsupial says:

    Not quite a similar situation, however being gay in many parts of the world is not really acceptable. Only advice I would give is to try and stick to the liberal western European states/N america/Australasia schools. Sorry not much help!

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    • BeHonest says:

      I disagree. I am living in a very Catholic country with my partner and we are very out among colleagues and very accepted. Most schools with be fine with it and then just be smart outside the school community. If you are interested in a school, write to them; it doesn’t hurt to inquire.

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      • help with applications please says:

        So did you apply as a couple for the job fair? We are very discrete in our current schools as far as the parent community is concerned. We just want to get to the interview stage for jobs in Sth America but have been told by a recruiting agency that we will be pretty much looked over. 😦
        Are you in Sth America by any chance?

        Like

      • edoboy says:

        I’m working on a proposal to our school’s board to extend benefits to same-sex partners. I’d be really greatful if anyone who is at a school where they get benefits for their gay partner could contact me with some basic details about how the school handled things.

        I know many faculties in Asia have requested policy changes, but as far as I know non of the school in the region have implemented same-sex spouse benefits yet. I’d like our school to become a leader in this!

        Like

        • muckpuk says:

          We are working in a school in Thailand where the only GREAT thing is a non discrimination policy. We went to the London job-fair as a couple and I get all benefits as a married spouse. The only difference is that I still have to do VISA runs as Thailand itself did not recognize me as a legal spouse. We did also apply for some schools in Africa.Two schools told us very honestly that although they would love to hire us they can not guarantee our safety in those countrys as Gay couples can still be stoned to death! So I guess Africa is out. I have never been in the closet and I think it will not suit me much.

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          • d says:

            I would love to know what school you are at. I was at a big downtown international school in the Sukhumvit area for three years and left in 2010 due to the anti gay policy. Now my partner can get a retirement visa in Thailand I want to go back but obviously don’t want to go to a school

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            • M says:

              Hey, I was just wondering at which school you had problems. I just got accepted to a school there and I really hope it isnt the same one.

              Like

  26. help with applications please says:

    We are a female same sex couple with two children looking to attend two upcoming job fairs (AASSA and Search London). We are wondering if there are any other international school teachers out there in a similar situation. If so, how did you apply for the job fairs? Did you apply as singles or as married couples? We are officially Civil Partners under UK law but are not sure how we will be received if we apply as a couple for this upcoming recruitment season. Any thoughts from Heads of schools or teachers very much appreciated.

    Like

    • Trav45 says:

      I don’t know a lot about this, but I do think it depends on where you want to go. The Middle East is probably out. I have some gay friends(not together) who teach in two different ME countries; they were both told they would have to keep very private and that if it came out they were gay, they would have to be let go.

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      • suufia says:

        I work at the Carol Morgan Morgan School in Santo Domingo, Domincian Republic. We have same sex couples working here. Try applying🙂

        Like

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