What To Take and What to Leave Behind?

Of course, the answer depends on where you’re going. But for the perfect  “must take” list, some International Educators recommend bringing ear plugs for noisy sleeping environments, enough reading material for a year, US postage stamps so people traveling to the States can mail things for you, extra passport photos and a good map. With many of us getting ready to make an international move, and some for the very first time, what could be more timely than this Blog to discuss things to bring and things to leave behind?

61 Responses to What To Take and What to Leave Behind?

  1. Cat says:

    Moving to Thailand with husband & 2 children under 4. Any advice on what to bring?

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  2. Ltm says:

    I am leaving from the USA to teach in Cebu Philippines. Any advice on what to pack and leave behind would be helpful. I know that clothing and shoes are a must due to me wearing a 14 in clothing and 9 shoe. I wasn’t sure if I should pack deodorant, make-up, tampons and such. From what I’ve read here, I should probably leave my blow dryer behind.

    So far I have a list consisting of:
    Mosquito spray
    Portable water purifying bottle
    Clothing/shoes
    Hair products/make up
    A few digital photo frames
    Dog food (to help wean my mini snchautzer)
    Mayonnaise (I hear nothing comes close to Hellmanns)

    Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you so much!!

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  3. Christy says:

    We are moving to Guangdong to teach from the US. We both have US lap tops. What convertors should we bring? Where can we purchase these? A friend mentioned a universal power strip which can be purchased at Walmart… We would rather purchase these items before we leave the US… Any help/comments/advice.
    Thanks.

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  4. Van der Walt says:

    Read: dienuwesuidafrika.blogspot.com; bloody harvest + farm murders; afrikaner genocide. Take your sense of seeing Zimbabwe II in the making. (http://dienuwesuidafrika.blogspot.com/)

    Like

  5. Kelly says:

    My husband and I will be moving to Cape Town, South Africa in July. Does anyone have any words of wisdom for us?

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    • Sharon says:

      Cape Town is a world-class city and you should have no difficulty with purchasing groceries and household items. What you will find expensive are electronics and computer equipment. Just about everything else is reasonably priced. Note that most buildings are not insulated or heated and that it can get quite cold in June and July – those are their winter months. Bring fleece, wool and good rain gear. I will be living there for five weeks over that time myself before moving on to a new school in Mozambique. Be especially careful during World Cup season – I expect more crime because of opportunists. Be wary of certain areas of the city – especially at night.

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  6. Lisa says:

    Ask the expats in your new location for a sample of their shopping list. It will indicate gaps in what is imported. Explain what things are important to you (salon quality hair products, special sports shoes, cooking). This really helped with the new hires in Kuwait when I was there. I have been gone so long that my list gets shorter and shorter each year, but each country is different. Be prepared for the fact that you may dress very differently in a new country due to comfort, weather, local conditions etc. I am at high altitude in South America where everyone wheres long sleeve tshirts, jeans and boots. Sandals are out because the streets are nasty. My clothes from Eastern Europe don’t really work. I will do a good shop in the states in July.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Bring a Swiffer mop for cleaning floors!

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  8. reynoam says:

    I am leaving for Cairo, Egypt and I need to know what to bring! My friends are telling me to bring all my DVDS and such. But that is a whole suitcase by itself! Also tampons, make-up, shampoo; Do I really need to bring that stuff? I was just planning on bringing all my clothes. I will probably end up bringing 4 suitcases and just paying extra for them! I need a plan of what I should really bring! HELP ME!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Entertainment can be found with ease via Itunes and streaming. I have wasted the valuable weight on my first move and I am currently trying to sell all my DVD’s as I pack out of Europe to head to Cairo. The past two years of living abroad, I have found great comfort in scented candles, Glade plug ins (adaptors needed),Fabreeze is a safer alternative, boxes of Mac and Cheese, and a digital picture frame which saves the bulk of random frames. We all have our personal comforts. But take it from a person who moves every few years…it is just stuff that gets old, damaged, lost, and left behind as it becomes extra baggage–consumable products are what I tend to pack. Makeup, tampons, lotions, Skittles for the first week of school, and if I have extra room, I will slip in a bottle of Napa Wine. I am holding off on sending tons of clothes as the fashion and modesty levels will have to be observed first hand. Fabrics will also be more accommodating to the sand and heat if bought in Cairo. If you are in dire need you will be in a network of expats who can direct you to similar alternatives. You will travel a lot too, and will come across many places for new consumable discoveries. Happy packing! Less is better, keep in mind, you will be relying on others to help transport your boxes, and it may be a few weeks until you have keys to living quarters. Best!

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      • mimi in Saudi says:

        You best not try to bring in wine to Egypt! oh my But you will love their attention to nice smells with all the oud and other types of incense…enjoy…be safe…be vigilant rather than sorry…

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    • Anon says:

      You really only need to worry about bringing tampons, shampoo etc if you are particular about using certain brands. They have these things here – just perhaps not what you are used to or the exact thing you like. Also it may take time for you to find where to buy things and find the brands etc you do like here – just bring the basics to tide you over for the first week or so until you have a chance to get out and about finding stores etc.
      I would however say you should bring makeup – I am running out and cannot find the same foundation I am used to or a decent alternative in the right color. I wish I had brought deodorant from home – but I ws particular with a brand I always used and cant find anything even close.
      As for DVDs etc, maybe just bring some you really want but most likely you will find other members of staff in the same situation and get a network of sharing going on as is the case in my current school – or download them from here.
      I would say to bring your clothes – I did and am glad for it. There are stores here but it takes time to orient yourself and its nice to have clothes you like etc. Tailors can make clothes here but sometimes it is hit and miss – plus the whole bargaining which can be hassle if you are not into it. You might find some of the fashion here a bit different to your tastes also. I personally have avoided clothes shopping here, I dont like what I see half the time and prefer to shop when I go home – or as an excuse to treat myself on holidays🙂

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    • Trav45 says:

      I lived in Egypt for 5 years–you can get almost anything there! Especially if you live in Maadi, where stores cater to ex-pats. You can get Oreos and Nutter-Butters, for pete’s sake, and McDonald’s delivers. You’ll also get most Hollywood-type movies, and cable can get HBO and Showtime, so only take DVD’s if you’re a movie buff or there are some you especially love.

      Definitely bring your clothes–quality not that good in Egypt. And plan for winter! Buildings are cement and not very well heated, so you’ll get cold.

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  9. Suzteacher says:

    I am moving to Quito Ecuador this summer. Any advice on what to take or leave behind would be great! Thanks!

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    • hola says:

      I lived in Guayaquil for a number of years and visited Quito frequently. Bring a warm jacket for the winter months. Electronics are expensive so bring a lap top. Other than that you should be able to find anything in the malls of Quito. Have fun…I loved Quito.

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  10. Brains says:

    I am due to move to Dubai from the UK in August and I although I know there various shops etc where I can buy clothes, Books etc I still dont know what to take???? If anyone has been in my shoes any advice would be appreciated!!!

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    • cali says:

      I am in Dubai – believe me… you will want for NOTHING! I buy clothes in the States each summer simply because they are cheaper. Just bring clothes you like – modest for work and COOL. Leave the winter clothes at home – you will never need anything more than a light sweater. You will accumulate more ‘stuff’ than you ever bargained for anyway. My day of shopping today included Borders for a new novel, Starbucks and a pair of Gap jeans. Everything is here.

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  11. C says:

    When moving from US to Europe, I brought lots of my favorite books and clothes, personal items, like photos and hobby stuff. The books were a waste of space, though books here are twice the price, it’s still more convenient to buy as you want something or a book or two when you travel. Now I have lots of books I don’t want to send on to the next job, but don’t want to leave behind either.

    What I missed was my favorite kitchen utensils, pans etc and cookbooks since I had to develop a different way to cook; ie. more from scratch and less reliance on convenience foods that aren’t available here. English cookbooks are difficult to find.

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    • RT says:

      Books are cheap and readily available from sites such as Amazon, Ebay and thebookdepository.com posting to all over Europe. Amazon Marketplace is the best place to start as they usually have any book available from an independent seller for much less than the RRP.

      And yay for moving away from convenience foods!

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  12. Sue says:

    We are moving to Amman, Jordan and planning to sell almost everything here before we go. But what do we keep to take with us? Especially with regard to computers?
    And advice most welcome. This is our first foray teaching overseas.

    Thanks.

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    • Anonymous says:

      We’ve been teaching in Amman now for 4 years. The taxes and duty for bringing in things in a shipment are very high here which added to the already higher base price really adds up. No duty on what you bring in suitcases as excess baggage. BRING your own laptops from North America. They are quite a bit more expensive here. Clothing- you can buy here especially when it is on sale in August and January sales. If you have big feet (women size 9 or larger) bring shoes. House stuff…there are lots of cheaper stores like Carre Four here so no need to bring anything for the house other than what makes it feel yours so that on the days you feel homesick you have a little of home with you. Hard to find tampons so bring those. Beauty products are all here. I say bring your teaching stuff. If you like outdoors then bring your hiking shoes etc….. It is 220V here so don’t bring your 110 stuff. If you like using a crockpot, you can’t find them here anywhere. There are bookstores, even one with a second hand room! It is a GREAT place with the most perfect climate going. Very easy living. You’ll love it!

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  13. dan says:

    Moving to Cairo. Any advice?

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    • Anonymous says:

      For Cairo I would say bring your favorite health/beauty products. Good deordorant, lotions, shampoo, and the like. Over the counter medicines (especially for children) are not of the same quality.
      Clothing is expensive and not well made. Same for shoes.
      Everything else is here and probably more affordable than in your home country.

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  14. Katie says:

    I’m moving to Colombia for my first overseas teaching experience. I have been in contact with one teacher, but the teacher has been teaching overseas for almost 20 years. She admitted that her advice was perhaps a bit outdated or biased since she hadn’t been in the States in so long. Anyway, I’m curious if anyone has advice specific for Colombia. Thanks in advance!

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    • Jenna says:

      This is my third year in Colombia..
      Some things to bring…. Definitely bring clothes. They have reasonable shopping here, but sizes and trends are not as varied as elsewhere. They do have Zara and Carre-Four. However, the Zara is easily twice as much as in Spain or Europe. Bring hair product (ie mousse, hairspray) if you have a specific product you use. They do have some salon brands here, but they are outrageously expensive, and they may not have the particular brand that you buy. They have cosmetics here (Lancome, MAC, Clinique), but if you have lighter skin bring your own. It is expensive and they never have the color I use (Clinique Alabaster foundation)🙂 Also, bring lots of English books. They do have some book stores here with English books, but it is difficult to pay 3 or 4 times the cost just to have them here. And, the selection is limited.
      YOu can find pretty much anything else you might want or need, at varying prices. I always bring brown sugar from home since the brown sugar here is very coarse and doesn’t bake the same way🙂
      Have fun and enjoy the culture. The people here are very friendly and a lot of fun.

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      • Kris says:

        I am also moving to Colombia in August. I have a friend teaching at the school I will be going to and she has said the same. I plan to scan in my school documents instead of shipping them, and am hoping to get all my clothes into 2 suitcases.

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  15. sue says:

    I’ll be heading to China (near Shanghai)in August – going from Europe on a two year contract and wondered whether to take electrical appliances like a hairdryer with me? What about netbook or similar? Are they readily available/cheaper/reliable?
    Any more advice for a single lady?
    Thanks.

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    • shanghaiguy says:

      I would only bring your hairdryer and netbook because you have them already. Don’t buy any electronics because you fear they may not be available here, they are in probably 20 different colors and shapes.

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      • Mr. C says:

        I would say NO to the hairdryer or most any other appliances. Even with a voltage adapter, even when the label on your plug reads 110-220 V, certain appliances FRY on 220 V. I’ve found this to be especially true on appliances that use oscillating currents – hair dryers, electric shavers, coffee grinders, anything with a spinning device. Computers do OK though.

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  16. Craig says:

    I will be heading to St. Petersburg, Russia for my first overseas assignment. Any Russia-specific advice is greatly appreciated! Thank you.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I worked in Russia up until last year – but way out East. I imagine that St Petersburg will have a lot more than where I was. I would take an ereader if you enjoy reading, I found the Russian Postal system somewhat challenging… Things took a while and it was possible they could go missing. (Chocolate disappered from a gift parcel on one occasion leaving just the other items – one collegue had a food parcel arrive with just the empty crisp packets. LOL!) I have also seen people go from pillar to post because post office decide the parcel needs customs clearance. So using an e-reader rather than waiting for book parcels might be helpful. I found no English bookshops where I was – although I would not know about St Petersburg. Clothes wise – they can be expensive, but you can get things.(Shoe shopping is great fun here!) One of my male friends assure me that Russian jeans are of excellent quality. Ask collegues at your new school about any particular food items you like. I always took Marmite with me. Generally though I thought the food selection was very good – particularly the made up salads. I should imagine that in a big city you will not have the same problems with restrictions on vegetables that I experienced – although they may still be expensive in the winter. Overall It is worth remembering that things can be way more expensive in Russia. I had a good time where I was and it is important to take a pretty chilled out attitude with you – when dealing with authorities and red tape you will need it!

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  17. Dianne says:

    My husband and I are taking a two year contract in Morocco. What is not available there? We will esentially have what the airline will allow, and that’s that. What is needful and what can be obtained there? Thanks bunches!

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  18. Nancy says:

    I will be going to Tanzania. I would like help with a short list of things to take. Please help.

    Thank you

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  19. Chriso says:

    What a helpful site this is! I’m moving to Guatemala just outside Guatemala City. Talking to other teachers already there is great. I was told forget shipping stuff. It ends up sitting in warehouses and you may not get it all in the end. Take extra suitcases instead and pay extra for them since you’ll get reimbursed anyway. I think that sounds like very good advice and might help eleminate the temptation to pack too much. I’m wondering about the best way to get mail. Through the school’s mail service perhaps? Also, is paying bills online any different/riskier there than here? I don’t want to burden anyone in the states with that task. Any other advice someone might have regarding moving to Guatemala would be appreciated.

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  20. azzwell says:

    Korea, most everything is available here, for a price. Costco’s entry into the country has proven to be a god send for western products. Deoderant is now available in most towns, but expensive. Seoul has an excellent English bookstore, what the book, that ships anywhere in Korea for about two dollars, usually next day. The only things really lacking, if you are not in Seoul, are clothes. Bigger clothes are still hard to find, women will have trouble if not Korean size, ie bras. Shoes can also be tough if you have wide or larger feet. Over the counter medicine is limited, like cough syrup and the like, doctor visits are covered under national health, which you will probably be enrolled in, good care, very cheap, RX’s also cheap.
    For me, I am moving to Myanmar, any advice?

    Like

  21. RB says:

    Am moving from China to Korea, with 2 kids. Any advice out there? Thanks!

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  22. RT says:

    We are moving to Malaysia in July. We are a family of 4 with 2 kids aged (then) 4 and 9 months. Any advice on essentials we must bring? (I know Mothercare is there but I’ve heard it’s very expensive.) Are kids’ clothes easily found and affordable. Footwear for kids? Clothes for western women (UK size 10) and men (M/L)? Thanks!

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi,
      You shouldn’t have a problem with childrens clothes or womens clothes if you are a size ten.A lot of the shops we have in the UK are in Malaysia including Topshop. It’s cheaper than the UK!!!! The only problem I had was with shoes as I have feet bigger than size 40.
      If your husband is tall he may struggle a bit with finding the right length but it’s cheap enough to use a tailor.
      You can get almost everything u have in the UK in most major citiesincluding herbs and spices and other food you can get in UK. Just go to the big western supermarkets.
      You’ll love Malaysia🙂

      Like

  23. Anna K says:

    Kuwait has most everything you will want — it is definitely a consumer society with an amazing amount of shopping and HUGE malls. When traveling don’t forget your documents for work permits. Often places will only take originals or certified copies of transcripts, diplomas. Make colored copies of your passport and bring many passport photos wherever you go. And bring comfortable shoes. As a woman if you wear over size 42 it is very difficult to find shoes to fit.

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  24. I am moving to Bangkok in July with my wife and 2 year old daughter. We are purging, purging, purging. Huge yard sale scheduled for Memorial Day weekend. Photos are being packed carefully, sans frames and we are bringing our own sports equipment and laptops.

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  25. JayJay says:

    I have worked in China, now I am in Kuwait, my 3rd year here. You can buy ANYTHING you need in Kuwait, and don’t bother shipping heavy books, everything is on the net these days! In both China and Kuwait, don’t take many clothes. Take a few favorites and get some tailoring done. Tailors are cheap, and very good at copying, not so good at making originals for you.Travel light, it makes the experience so much easier, and more fun.

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  26. Chris says:

    Bring an extra battery for your computer. And particular spices that you like to cook with: poultry seasoning, for example. Find out if English reading material is readily available (in Turkey, it wasn’t) or consider Kindle, etc….

    Be aware of things you touch or look at every day, and bring them: a favorite bowl, a photograph. The amount of comfort it will bring is well worth the space in your luggage. And an extra suitcase, because you will find new treasures, new spices, new beauty…

    Appalling and yet perhaps comforting to realize that so much from our culture will be available to you wherever you are….

    Like

  27. troy says:

    My wife and I have been offered our 1st intl teaching jobs in Mexico City. We currently live in Atlanta, GA. We have 2 boys who will be 10 and 3 this summer. We are thinking about getting rid of one car and driving the other to MXC. What kind of stuff should we bring and how much?

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  28. James Abela says:

    When we left for Malaysia we literally took three suitcases, shipped my books and sold everything else we owned. It worked out well for us, because nearly everything in Malaysia was much cheaper than the UK!

    The one thing I’d never go without is my teaching materials, which I brought on CD-ROMs. (These days, a large pen-drive is perfect.) Most teachers would also bring a laptop, if they already own one. (It was cheaper to buy a new one in KL for me)

    If you know people in the country that you are going to, ask them because you’d be surprised at what you can and can’t get in your destination country. There were only 2 things I couldn’t get in KL very easily: A Styptic pencil (For shaving) and Aqueous cream. (There were plenty of alternatives.)

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    • Sarah says:

      Thanks for your reply, James. My husband and I are taking our first overseas jobs in Lesotho and we plan to do exactly what you did: ship books, bring suitcases, store the best and sell the rest. Glad to know it worked out well for you. Hopefully our story will be similar!

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  29. Shanghaiguy says:

    If you are coming to China, consider bringing a self inflating camping mattress. The beds can be hard as rock here in China, even in the swankiest hotels, and you will appreciate a good night’s rest after a day out and about. Having blown a number of electrical appliance brought from home I would suggest waiting to buy appliances until you get incountry. Footwear, especially if you have feet outside the norm, can be difficult to find and expensive once you do find it. A small first aid kit filled with familiar medications, nothing like trying to explain your symptoms in sign language, to make you remember to include this in your baggage. Don’t forget all your banking information, maybe open a joint bank account with a sibling or close friend so they can pay North American bills for you. You’ll be amazed at how much stuff you accumulate while overseas so don’t overpack. Bring enough cash to make it through the first month or two, you may not get paid till the end of September. Bring some US dollars to have in reserve for holidays.

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    • LS says:

      Thanks for the tips – my husband and I will be moving to Shanghai this August. Would you suggest bringing all our clothes or can we get a lot of that there?

      Like

      • Amanda says:

        Hi Ls,

        My husband and I just spent five years living in Shanghai. You can find almost anything you want to buy there now. This wasn’t the case a few years ago, but a lot has changed. I would recommend bringing shoes if you are over a size 40. This was the most difficult to find, although you can find them. You can buy almost any food or seasonings you need but they do come at a price. Western groceries stores are available but expensive. I used to take the small packets of seasonings of my favorites along with me. There is a pharmacy near the Ritz Carlton that has English speaking workers and the health care in Shanghai at Western clinics is really very good. I wouldn’t worry about taking too many medications although you may want to take the essentials just so that you have them on hand if you need them. I would not bring a mattress with you. You can buy inflatable mattresses at Decathalon and you can buy good mattress pads at IKEA in any size you need. As far as bank accounts go, we kept our US Bank account open and maintained it along with our Chinese bank. Every few months, we would transfer funds and had all of out US bills set up for automatic withdrawl. Make sure to bring all your legal papers, birth cert. a copy of your passport can come in handy, marriage lic., divorce papers if you have them etc. And, yes, budget yourself the first couple of months. It is not pleasant to run out of money before you get your first paycheck. On one last note, my husband and I eventually invested in a car which changed our quality of life in Shanghai drastically, for the better. I wouldn’t recommend it right away, but it is something you may want to consider. Please let me know if you have any questions. I am happy to help.

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        • shanghaiguy says:

          Decathalon is a great sports store, I had forgotten they sell the camping mattresses. As for other sources of clothes, cultivate a tailor by spending time with him/her to get your measurements correct, and you can get all sorts of clothing made from pea jackets to evening wear to casual clothes. You can also get handmade shoes with a similar amount of patience.

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      • Amanda says:

        Clothes…you can find Western sizes in Shanhgai now but the selection is limited. Decathalon carries Western sizes in their sports apparel and the is an H&W which is fantastic. You can also have clothes made which can be fun but also at times, frustrating. I would bring enough with you unless you are small and petite.

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    • DD says:

      Hi-
      I will be leaving for Hong Kong in July. Can you tell me if your China advice also applies to the SAR? You are not the first person to recommend a mattress, but I’ve also heard that there is an Ikea in HK. I’m a 5’10” woman with feet to match, so I’m told I should bring a lot of clothes and shoes. You just confirmed that, too. I’d appreciate any other info you have about Hong Kong. Thanks!
      DD

      Like

      • Hkteach says:

        Hi DD. I’m in HK. It’s hard to find western sized clothing and shoes. Everything else is here. I bought a self inflating camping mattress for traveling in China, but don’t use here. You can buy one in HK if you need it. It rolls up into a small cylinder shape and I take it with me when I go to China. Ikea is here, as are thousands of other great places to shop. You can get absolutely everything in HK, although you have to hunt around for some of them.

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  30. Thomas says:

    You will find almost everything you would want to buy in North American stores, never mind all the American restaurants. If you take any prescription medication, take a year’s supply. When you’ll arrive this summer the temperature will hover around 50 degree celcius. Loose fitting, lightweight, light colored clothing are most suitalbe and comfortable in hot weather like that. Don’t forget to bring a hat and a water bottle.
    Be prepared to experience a culture and possibly a school environment you never have before. Be willing to let go, to be open and when tough moments come about (and they will), be with friends who can commiserate with you and find the bright and fun side to life in Kuwait.

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  31. cali says:

    I think whatever you can fit in 2 suitcases is what you should bring. Clothes are often of cheap quality and grossly over-priced outside N.A, so bring only that. You can find everything you need in Kuwait – everything. I do not agree with the feminine products, et al. There are very few places on earth that you can not find what you need. Pack light – lose the attachments. You will be much happier without all that stuff to drag around the world.

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  32. Edwin says:

    Find out more about the country and the city you’re going: what stuffs are available and what things you can’t get – then decide what to bring from home. Email current teachers of the school you will be working – they are a good source of information. Pack only essential things you need: check your moving/relocation arrangements to make sure the extra weights you paid are well worth it. A good supply of medications (’till your next holiday home) would be essential. Be cautious about bringing-in heavy and expensive electronics items – consider getting them locally if available.

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  33. juju says:

    Bring ten times anything you would bring along with you to a hotel for a weekend trip. And then some. Women… feminine hygiene an beauty products times six to 12 months. And electrical converters.

    Like

  34. Linda says:

    good info
    thanks
    I am going to Kuwait in August and am SO ready to go but as the time gets close I keep finding things in the “wish I knew that” category

    Like

    • RH says:

      I agree with Edwin – make contact with someone from Kuwait. Most everything is available at reasonable prices- if you ‘hunt’ for them.

      Clothes, bring your own, check the dress codes regarding school policy, if you have special meds that you are taking – ask for availability here (most are available now,, but some are not). BRING YOUR own laptop and your back up software.

      I am in Kuwait now. Our first trip over – way to much ‘stuff’ brought. Have streamlined greatly and have survived nicely.

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    • Darshan says:

      I am also going to Kuwait in August first time. Are you at ASK? I have piles of stuff that I think I want to bring and am attempting to cull. A friend who lives over there says to have skype on your computer and a majic jack for phone (niether are available in Kuwait).

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