A Pedestrian’s Tale from Kuwait

Although the author of this adventure has changed some facts to achieve what he calls “fictional accuracy,” he reports that the “hallucinations are real” in this fanciful narration of walking to work through the streets of Hawally, Kuwait. A tale by international teacher, Marty Rempel:

“…Moses had it easy with the Red Sea. Having the ability to part a sea is not actually a level playing field. Knowing full well I could not part the traffic and realizing the force is not with me, nor seldom is, I tentatively walked on the sidewalk parallel to the constant flow of TATA buses, scooters, trucks, taxis and foul smelling diesel engines…
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…I was about to go for it, cross Tunis Street that is, when to my utter surprise, and partial satisfaction, my pants started to vibrate…”  Continue

4 Responses to A Pedestrian’s Tale from Kuwait

  1. Ian says:

    Not an unusual experience although an unfortunate one. Having worked as an administrator in various Gulf states, I too have been subjected to owners whose only concern is parents’ demands, and to UK providers in the UAE whose only concern is holding on to their lucrative ADEC contracts. When these situations have priority, academic integrity goes out the window. My best advice is hang in to the end of the school year, get a good reference and then get out!

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  2. expataussiegal says:

    I know exactly how you feel – every day my partner and I use this same method to cross Gulf Rd near our apartment in Salmiya. It’s only a matter of time before it all ends in tears!

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  3. Overseas 2 says:

    Outstanding!! You captured how I felt traveling by foot around Guatemala City. The problem back here in the States is that everyone is asleep at the wheel and although pedestrians do have the right-of-way, the chance of getting struck is even greater. And, as for the pedestrians….I just love the way they walk out in front of cars here as if they were an indestructible, ominous object for which all will stop! I suppose these two traffic idiosyncrasies are the product of a society in which every thing is so ordered you think you can predict your day before it starts…boring at best!

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  4. Well said! Thank you for helping me cross Kuwait off my list of possible destinations (although as a single woman, it was probably impossible anyway, and I wasn’t really tempted.) I have lived in Shenzhen, China, and it was OK,actually quite wonderful in many ways. But I enjoyed reading your vibrant prose.

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