Arrest of India’s U.S. Deputy Consul Brings Repercussions for American Teachers in India

police29853509Americans teaching in India’s International schools may soon feel strong repercussions from the arrest, strip search and jailing of India’s Deputy Consul General, Devyani Khobragade, by New York police. Mrs. Khobragade has been charged with creating false documents, falsifying a visa application and mistreating her domestic servant. She claimed to be paying her Indian maid $4200 monthly when in fact she was paying her $3.31 an hour.

The Indian government claims the manner in which the arrest was carried out is inhumane and barbaric. In response, they have revoked all diplomatic privileges for American Embassy personnel and removed protective barriers protecting the U.S. embassy. The Indian government says it will now examine what the American Embassy pays its Indian help and how much domestic help is paid by U.S. government Diplomats. It was also announced that India plans to review the salaries, bank accounts and tax status of all American teachers working in International Schools throughout the country.

In response to India’s claims of mistreatment, the U.S. Attorney’s office concurs that the diplomat was “fully searched by a female Deputy Marshal — in a private setting” It was further clarified that the search is “standard practice for every defendant, rich or poor, American or not, in order to make sure that no prisoner keeps anything on his person that could harm anyone, including himself.”

The attorney’s office reports that agents arrested Mrs. Khobragade in the most discreet way possible, and unlike most defendants she was not handcuffed. The office maintains the diplomat was extended courtesies that go well beyond what others receive, such as allowing her to sit in a squad car and use her cell phone to arrange for child care for her children. They claim to have even delivered coffee to her. A New York based organization, Safe Horizon, representing the maid, has disclosed that she is in the U.S. under ‘Continued Presence’, a temporary immigration status for victims of human trafficking.

Indian diplomats seem most incensed by the strip search procedure. In retaliation, one angry diplomat has called for the revocation of visas issued to the LGBT partners of American embassy employees, followed by a jail sentence for being in contempt of Indian law.

It appears both countries have, up-to-now, followed a policy of turning a blind eye to each others’ practices. The arrest of Deputy Council Khobragade has obviously severed that unspoken agreement.

Comments? How will this incident affect recruiting?
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40 Responses to Arrest of India’s U.S. Deputy Consul Brings Repercussions for American Teachers in India

  1. Concerned says:

    Can I ask what nationality you are ANONYMOUS ? Many fine and valid points have been made yet you poo poo them, with inflamatory rhetoric. What does that achieve ? I believe the indians did invent the number zero, they want everything for free. As much as you have shown you dislike Americans, do you also dislike Canadians, Australians, British, Irish ?
    I could say you need to find balance, and I could go on to many other comments you have made but that would be a waste of time.
    Your obviously a troubled soul with no idea of what is fair and reasonable.

    And at the end of the day, she broke the law, whether it was in New York, London, Toronto, Dublin, she acted outside the law and needs to be called to account.

    I can only hope you are not in a position of man management, and I am sure you are very fond of zeros !!!

    Like

    • Concerned says:

      As this has gone outside the scope of the forum/blog, if you wish to quote, please make sure I am quoted correctly. No add ons and misinformation. I wish you well and hope you find help soon.
      But back to the original theme,
      1. I hope the women is punished to the full extent of the law
      2. I am appalled to think that an american teacher would be interfered with due to an unrelated issue
      3. I wonder what financial aid comes out of the USA to India and what good it does, do you know ?
      4. Apologies to all for the back and forth.
      5. Please before you Anonymous make any further comment look at USAID to whatever country you may be from and take a broader look at the AID offered internationally by the great nation and it’s people of the US of A !!!!!
      6. Criticism is easy, try praise, works with students also !

      Like

  2. Brien says:

    As a consul: Consular officials (that do not have concurrent diplomatic accreditation) formally have a more limited form of immunity, generally limited to their official duties.
    She broke the law.

    Like

  3. Susan says:

    Whoa! This article has spawned a lot of vitriol between individuals. The point of this comment section is to give an opinion – not spew animosities between ISR readers. I, for one, would appreciate the lack of personal comments and sticking to the point!

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Maybe it’s irrelevant, but I want to post a quote of Marie-Louise von Franz from her introduction to her book “Shadows and evil in fairy tales”. I started reading the book right after I posted my comment here and finding the paragraph related to India was like a sign and an answer to some of my questions. Quote: “All civilizations, but especially the Christian, have also their own shadow. This is a banal statement, but if you study other civilizations you can see where they are better than we are. In India, for example, they are far ahead of us in their spiritual and philosophical attitude in general, but their social behavior to our minds, is shocking. If you had walked through the streets of Bengal you would have seen numbers of people obviously starving to death; they were in extremis, yet no one took any notice, for that is their “karma”, and people must attend to themselves, to their own salvation; to look after others would only mean being involved in worldly considerations. To us, Europeans, this social attitude spoils the whole country, for it is revolting to see people starving and ignored. We could call this plight the shadow of Indian civilization. Their extraversion is below the mark and their introversion above. It could be that the light side is not aware of the dark side, which is so obvious to another civilization”

      Happy New Year to all! Peace!

      Like

  4. Anonymous says:

    As someone who has lived in India and worked with Embassy persons there, I know it is true that both countries “turn a blind eye” on various practices that benefit their countries. (This is what “diplomacy” involves, and one is naïve to think otherwise.) Overseas teachers are often drawn into agreements between higher-ups, as these are set up over long time private agreements between embassies/diplomats (which have nothing to do with negotiating/signing individual teacher contractual agreements).

    The US could have chosen a far less visible approach with the Indian diplomat—-fined her, or taken a different route that assured the employee was paid a decent wage. The over-the-top arrest/search was not needed for a diplomat whose infringement is of a kind and degree that does not involve a violent offense.

    The incident does prove how vulnerable international teaching contracts can be and how, in the end, these positions are not truly “secure” as they can be altered at any time by the host country.

    Like

  5. Bruce says:

    It would be most helpful to understand why this person was detained and arrested. According to the article, “Mrs. Khobragade has been charged with creating false documents, falsifying a visa application and mistreating her domestic servant.”

    If any of us were to create and try to pass off false documents in any of our host countries we could expect to be: 1. detained 2. arrested and 3. processed according to local custom as an accused criminal. I don’t think the US government cares enough about the domestic help of any foreign diplomat to arrest them. However, most governments of any sovereign nation will take great umbrage to the falsification of documents.

    As for the specifics, which we do not know at this telling, it would appear that the woman arrested and her employer are ignoring the reason for the arrest. I might also say that any attorney would tell you the only defense of the indefensible is to attack. This appears to be the case at hand. Or, if you are a fan of Shakespeare it could be simply put, “Me thinks thou dost protest too much”.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      That’s exactly what the US officials are doing: attacking the Indians for their immediate reaction in the most undiplomatic, arrogant and ignorant way. Projection, projections.. Whys are you so sure that the reasons for her detention are not fabricated? Do you believe everything you read in US American newspapers?

      Like

      • Bruce says:

        Interesting that you are anonymous. Your response seems to flail about while relying on no documentation to support your suppositions. Have we been given any indication to contradict the original reasons for the arrest by the Indian Government or any other source?

        However you should bear in mind, if you believe everything evil and negative about the intentions of the US government you should realize that you are already known to them through this post, they are tracking you, and there could easily be a drone in your future. (sarcasm intended)

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          I believe you use your sarcasm with “evil and negative intentions.” US American drones have killed many innocent people. “An estimated 286 to 890 civilians have been killed, including 168 to 197 children.Amnesty International found that a number of victims were unarmed and that some strikes could amount to war crimes”. What if among those killed were your children, your relatives? ” You’d say: Oh well.. it’s in the name of democracy”? Actually I am anonymous here because I didn’t pay for the subscription. I am surprised I can post here. I express my opinion and it’s based on many facts and on my personal experience.

          Like

  6. Mike says:

    Hmmm … She was treated better than the average person: she was allowed to sit, allowed to phone to have her children safeguarded, allowed a coffee, and assigned a female to grope inside her vagina and anus in a private setting. As an average person myself, I’m very glad I’m unlikely to be arrested in America as I have no intention of ever going there!

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      She was treated better than an average person for sure.. They may detain an average Muslim person without a trial and torture him/ her, and even torture into confession. Just recently I read about the standard interrogation techniques the US police uses on a regular basis that force “average” people into making false confessions. She is very lucky indeed! Strip search is always necessary to intimidate and humiliate “an average” person! Strip searching a foreign diplomat in “democratic” “America” is also a norm.. By the way, I doubt they’d apply it to rich/ famous US Americans. It’s not good to be “an average” person, especially a foreigner, especially a foreigner from a non-Western country in the USA.

      Like

      • Ibrahim Senkola says:

        I think you will find that the detainment of people by countries’ security forces is certainly not confined to Muslims, nor to the USA. If you do feel the need to make comment here please don’t make it out of ignorance.

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          Racial/country of citizenship profiling in the USA and the UK happens all the time I made the comment out of knowledge and my personal experience.. not sure what motivated you to call me ignorant.

          Like

  7. As opposed to the “true” sense of superiority Brahmins exhibit? “You are children. When your culture is 5,000 years old, you will have the caste system too.” Word for word nonsense I heard while traveling through India and witnessing unimaginable social horrors there (untouchables sifting through funeral ashes for metal teeth, rotting away from leprosy, crippled as children that they might beg more effectively, cleaning raw sewage from fetid pipes with their bare hands, etc.).

    American political outrages aside (and they are admittedly legion), upper class Indians are by and large some of the most shamelessly arrogant snobs on earth and quite literally believe that the lower class multitudes they trample on with oblivious gusto deserve such treatment due to malfeasance in their previous lives. Neat trick, I guess, if you can pull it off… It’s perfectly apropos that instead of refuting the charges against this apparently slave-driving consular woman, Indian bigwigs cry foul over her treatment at the hands of inferior outcasts. Anyone here ever worked a hospitality sector job and had the privilege of serving well-off Indians? Suffice it to say you might want to prepare yourself for a haughty dose of exact change…

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  8. Anonymous says:

    This is ridiculous, you follow the laws of the country you are in, if you break the laws you are under the jurisdiction of the country you are in. Why did this turn into an international incident, in the US if you commit a crime the process is the same for everyone. If you commit a crime elsewhere then the process may be different, but you still must deal with the consequences. Simple fact, she has been accused of breaking a law, so she falls under US jurisdiction. The comment about the diplomatic process is right on, it is ridiculous the amount of liberties given to people with a diplomatic passport.

    Like

    • trav45 says:

      “in the US if you commit a crime the process is the same for everyone. ”

      Wow. I’m an American and even I say that’s a ridiculous statement. Remember the wealthy teen who killed a woman and was sentenced to a posh resort? VS. the poor black woman who shot into the air to scare off an attacked and is now facing serious jail time.

      Like

  9. Brien says:

    She broke the law – a fair law.
    She was treated in the same manner, in fact with more respect than Americans can expect.
    Any apologies by the Indian government on her unethical behaviour yet?

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      The USA and ethics and humanity.. It is a very interesting topic. From genocide of Native Americans (and stealing their land) and slavery to bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, modern day drone bombing and killing innocent people on a regular basis, use of torture, widely-spread NSA spying.. The list of all kinds of abuses is VERY long. It is the country that has produced and sold (and continues to do it) the most weapons of destruction and has spread the most violence around the world. For most US Americans it is all about $$. They want them so bad that they would sell as many bombs as possible, would go anywhere to exploit cheap labor and find countries where the laws are the best suited to exploit the local people to the maximum, like they do it in China with the apple factories workers, for example. I wouldn’t be surprised to find out how much less they pay to Indian teachers and make them work much more. No cast system in the USA? Racism is still alive and prevalent in the USA, especially in the Southern States! Lynching of black was still happening in the 70s. The income gap between the richest 1 percent and the rest of the USA widened to a record last year! The ignorant, arrogant, hypocritical, self-righteous people are not capable of realizing how much damage they’ve done (and continue to do) to the humanity, but on the contrary consider themselves the best #1nation, and continue to spread their version of “democracy” using the most unethical inhumane methods. I am afraid they’d never understand why the vast majority of Indians are so outraged about the case with the Indian diplomat. They will continue to accuse India (and other counties who disagree) and justify themselves. They do everything right in their eyes. It’s the Others who are always wrong, irrational, barbaric, etc.

      Like

      • Bruce says:

        Really, your outrage is as amusing as it is pathetic.
        Shall we compare India the nation with the USA as a nation?
        Oh let’s shall….

        Point by Point
        “genocide of Native Americans (and stealing their land)”
        Ok, genocide has never happened in India would be what you must be claiming. You would be lying if you said it has not happened.
        Further, on this point most of the Native Americans who died because of contact with European settlers happened to die due to disease. 85+% of the attrition in in the native peoples of the Americas was caused by disease. You could argue it was germ warfare but that would lead to a discussion of intent. It was not mostly or even commonly attacks with bullets and blades (or “lead poisoning”) that killed the Native Americans. Those episodes did happen where the US government sanctioned genocide but to say the peoples of India have never had such episodes would be another lie.

        Stealing their land – let us go broader and call it stealing of resources. There have never been any wars within India or her “provinces” which put one group against another? I am sure there haven’t.

        Slavery
        “Well now that dog just won’t hunt”
        Yes, the Americas had slavery. The Native Americans in both North and South America held slaves prior to and after the Europeans arrived. Once the Europeans arrived they bought slaves who were taken and sold by Africans, Arabs, Chinese and Indians to European traders.
        (I am in no way condoning this … it is abominable) That isn’t to forget the peoples of India taken into custody, slavery and sold and sent to South Africa, which would only be a relatively equivalent form of enslavement. Having nothing to do with the slaves kept, bought and sold in India for centuries before and after that time.

        The “bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki”
        Yes, a weapon was used during war that had devastating results on the enemy who started the war. And, (thank God) has never been used since. Ok, no atomic bombs were developed and used by Indians but when you take an elephant into battle with devastating results on your enemy is that really fair either? It was war and war is fought to be won. India has never had any wars so I am sure you cannot relate.
        (Just for the record that is what we call sarcasm….get over yourself already.)

        Next,
        “modern day drone bombing and killing innocent people on a regular basis, use of torture”
        You are correct here. The US should probably avoid killing with drones, and torturing people. I am sure nobody is ever killed indiscriminately in India nor has there ever been a time or two of terror in India’s brilliantly pure past where torture was ever used.

        “widely-spread NSA spying..”
        For heaven’s sakes…..spying? No other country spies on any other or steals their manufacturing techniques or intellectual property? If the US didn’t spy it could be argued the diplomat wouldn’t have been caught so yes, it is all the USA’s fault.

        As a summation point:
        “The list of all kinds of abuses is VERY long.”
        Yes, it is. But, to say that India doesn’t and has not engaged in similar abuses is not accurate. Nations do not simply ‘spring into being’ because a unicorn prances across the land under a rainbow. They are built. They are built upon the struggle of one group of people seeking a better life at the expense of other groups. Did someone mention ‘Caste System’ or Royalty?

        Yes, I am not commenting on some of what you wrote. Most people will place their strongest and clearest arguments first so those are to what I have responded.

        At this time in the history of mankind people such as myself and yourself have the ability to sit back comfortably and through a totally different spectrum of values judge those that came before us. It is our privilege won by those that preceded us. We now view what has happened historically as “bad and evil” we have that privilege. However, if you can name one living person (I know you can’t) in the US who has owned slaves, or committed genocide (yes, atrocities have been committed by some still living – mostly now punished and imprisoned) then your argument is still invalid. Your argument is invalid because it does not address the reason the Indian diplomat was arrested.

        The woman was caught when she broke the law. Would you have the Indian Government let foreigners break your laws with impunity? Or, would you expect they would be arrested and processed as any criminal?

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          Thank you for your reply. First of all, sorry to disappoint you: there is no outrage on my part. Projections, projections..

          The USA has justified all its crimes against humanity by creating all kinds of myths, myths of heroism, necessity in order to save humanity from “the evil”, etc. . As we all know, the US government breaks all kinds of international laws with impunity. As far as I know George Bush and his inhumane puppets are not imprisoned. Also, some US Americans still own slaves, legal/ illegal immigrants from Latin America. Do you want to hear some of the stories about how the people are treated by their US “masters”, in the USA and abroad? There are some horrible stories with the most disgusting details.
          Yes, in regards to the situation: animosity will only get worse for the USA doesn’t know how to use diplomacy, doesn’t understand nuances and subtleties of Indian culture (an other cultures), continues its typical bully-like arrogant behavior.

          Like

      • Pablo says:

        Why are you so sure Anonymous that it’s fabricated? Because rich people never abuse or lie about payment to their helpers? Living in Hong Kong I see how helpers are treated. Never given legal holidays off, or any days off, and forced to sleep in cupboards. What does the US gain with this “fabrication”? No matter, the abuse was brought to the attention legal authorities, and the authorities felt that an arrest was warranted. The overreaction is from the Indian government and it feels nothing about the helper and only worries because their diplomat woman was searched by another woman. OMG!!! Get over yourself.
        You sure throw out a lot of stereotypes. Should I throw out some Indian stereotypes? You say, “The USA only cares about $$.” Yes, because Indians hate $$. Right?
        Yes, there is racism in the USA, but you act like there’s none in India or anywhere else in the world. Calling America racist is a typical cheap shot used during a weak argument, too! But let me leave you with this. I see hundreds of thousands of Indians moving to that, “racist and barbaric,” USA and trying to get out of India to find a better life, but you don’t see the reverse. Why? Think about that while the courts try to solve your diplomat’s poor judgement.

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          What is the % of US Americans who are in debt and/or on Prozac? Those who want to immigrate to the USA are delusional and/or poisoned by the vulgar materialistic mentality of the USA.

          Like

      • Brien says:

        Irrelevant – Stay on topic!

        Like

  10. Mattie says:

    I used to work in Delhi, first for an Indian Education company then for Am. Emb. School. This over the top reaction on the part of Indian govt. officials is a joke. First of all, per Indian visa requirements, all foreigners working in India for an Indian company must be paid a minimum of 100.000 rupees a month, about $2000 give or take. The people I worked for tried to cheat me by doing a fake contract and claiming I was a part time language teacher. This organization is quite a well-known intl school group in the mid-east run by Indians. So, I don’t understand why they say they want to examine contracts of US citizens working for Indians when they know that there is a national law requiring a minimum salary. Further, if you are working for a non-Indian company/organization, it is not the business of the Indian govt. what your benefits or salary are, as your pay will go into your foreign bank account. And everyone knows that India is a “hardship post” so salary/benefits are higher than they would be working in your home country, for any foreigners, not just US citizens.
    Working at AES is coveted by Indians, whether as TAs, teachers, admin or grounds-keepers. Why? Because pay and working conditions are so much better than working for any Indian employer. Getting an embassy job at any of the western embassies, as well as Japan, Israel, Singapore, S. Korea or any European country is also highly desirable. I employed a nanny for my 2 children, who worked about 35 hrs/week, paid many thousands of rupees above the going rate, and whom I treated as a human being. All domestic staff in Delhi, once they acquire some basic language skills (English of otherwise) want to work for foreigners, with Americans, British, Australians and Japanese being the most coveted. The other point that the Indian politicians are missing is that Indians working for Americans are living in India. Americans don’t take “servants” with them when they go abroad unless they are extremely wealthy. Hardly the profile of the average teacher or diplomat. The Indian govt. and public knows this. My nanny absolutely refuses to work for Indians, as do all domestic workers once they are able to “break into” the expat circle. Nobody wants to work for Indians, no exceptions.
    This blustering and bullying on the part of Indians is ridiculous, but as my Indian husband says, a lot of it is for show because 2014 is an election year. I would like to see their reaction if we end the H1B program effective immediately, as well as require that all embassy staff hire only non-Indians as domestic workers and admin staff. There are plenty of Tibetans and Nepalis, and a few Burmese, with excellent work ethics.
    By the way, I think the word in the title of this article should be “consul” not “council.” A council is a group of people; a consul is a diplomatic position. And she was a deputy, not the consul general.

    Like

    • Parameswaran P. says:

      Ms. Mattie… With due regards, let me answer your immature expression over the issue of our Indian ambassador (Deputy). The ill treatment shown on our lady is considered as a matter of national insult since she represents/mediates/ liaisons between both the countries. But you have poured out your personal problems such as working condition, climatic condition, etc. You mentioned that you pay several thousands to your domestic help. Is it unaccountable or invisible? You need not teach any Indian about hospitality and being an American you better avoid talking about humanity. .

      Like

      • Mattie says:

        You completely missed my point. Instead of attacking me personally, you need to go back and read more carefully. Hospitality has nothing to do with this, we are talking about labor/work conditions. The original post above was about the Indian government retaliating by investigating the pay of US citizens, and Indians working for US citizens/organizations, in India. It was not a discussion of the arrest of the diplomat, and I believe Preet Bharara’s statement that she was actually treated better than the average person. The Indian media loves to fan the flames and engage in yellow journalism. Remember the Norwegian child abuse case regarding an Indian couple and how the truth came out?? My reply, which included very valid examples from personal experience, was to point out the ridiculousness of targeting domestic staff/employees of US organizations/undividuals or Americans working for Indian companies. Indian officials are obviously trying to find examples of US citizens abusing/under-paying employees in India. I sincerely doubt they will find any, and as almost 2 weeks have gone by, I think we can assume that this is a lot of bluster.
        As for Indian hospitality: I don’t consider it hospitable when I am daily harassed sexually, have Indian “aunties” shove me out of the way in shops, have kids throw things at me, or have to deal with people constantly trying to cheat me, whether it’s the shop owner, the landlord, or the taxi driver all because I am a foreign female.

        Like

      • Brien says:

        Normal treatment to people who commit crimes.

        Like

  11. Nancy Kolde says:

    I’m happy something is being done about these diplomats. This woman from India is just the tip of the iceberg of how badly most diplomats behave, break local laws and use their immunity. I hope she gets the maximum sentence, and if any US diplomats are not observing local laws in India, the same should go for them too. The whole diplomatic system is flawed and corrupt and something should be done to clean it up.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Why do you want her to get a maximum sentence? Why do most US Americans think that justice is about punishment and are often hasty to believe the US American biased media’s side of a story?

      Like

      • Johnny says:

        Because she thought she was above the law. It has nothing to do with her country of origin. If an American did the same in India I would have no sympathy for him/her.

        Yes, justice = punishment. Why give her a free pass on this? If you break the law (with intent) as she did then she needs to be punished.

        Like

  12. Jon Cristofer Miller says:

    For the past 25 years, there have been numerous political scandals among highly placed American public officials – Republican and Democratic – for underpaying and/or employing undocumented foreign workers. Those Americans involved have lost jobs, paid fines, and/or served jail time. Lying about it – as appears to be the case with the Indian official – is just plain arrogant and stupid. As the Indian government is well aware, the Indian official’s limited immunity did not apply to lying under oath, or to evading labor laws. The Indian government should have settled the matter quietly, advised its staffs globally to respect national law, and brought the official back to India. The loss of status in the latter point would have been punishment enough. If the matter had hit the press anyway, the Indian government should have made a quick apology and made public its directives to stop any such behavior elsewhere. Instead, they gave their official a promotion and went on a diplomatic rampage. One final oddity in this case is the defense of a seemingly very attractive woman in a country with too many recent incidences of brutal treatment [rape, “honor” killings, etc.] of women. For the sake of American nationals serving in diplomatic, business, and teaching positions in India, one can only hope for calmer heads to prevail. I am not optimistic.###

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Typical reply of a typical US American with a false sense of superiority. The Indian government should do this, and the Indian government should do that.. You should stop telling others what they should do and start with yourselves.

      Like

      • My longer contribution was in response to Anonymous on 12-26…

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          Thank you for your reply! All the Brahmins I am acquainted with are spiritual, noble, educated, kind, sensitive, generous people. The US “elite” actively supports wars, spying, tortures..

          Like

          • Lovedmytimeabroad says:

            The conversations here are very similar to the kind of conversation taking place between the Indian and the American governments. Both the Indians and the Americans have painted themselves into a corner and getting out of it is going to be difficult. The diplomat’s treatment has, unfortunately, relegated the maid to a secondary discussion in India.One needs to understand that India and America are vastly different countries. The America of 2013 is not the America of 1776. The India of 2013 is not the India of 1967 and it has a long way to go before vested interests, a feudal attitude, etc is overcome. In the meantime, teachers should reconsider traveling out of their countries to such “hardship posts” like India. After all, better the freedom of your own country than economic gain. My understanding is that Indian authorities are now working on the concept of “reciprocity.” American diplomats and institutions will enjoy the same privileges that Indian diplomats enjoy in America. Seems fair.

            Like

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