Has ISR Helped You Make a Wise Decision?

stop-think-act44641327Letters from International Schools Review members telling us how we helped them avoid a “landmine-school” enforces our belief that we’re helping colleagues to make the best career moves. With more and more entrepreneurs creating for-profit, cash-cow schools, and employing Westerners to help complete the artificial image, it’s ever more important to be vigilant in vetting a school before making a commitment.

ISR makes the same strong, school-vetting recommendations every year. And then, about three months into the academic year, we begin getting emails saying, “I wish I would have read the Reviews before I came here!”

A teacher recently wrote to tell ISR she would have made a tragic error had she signed with a school, a school the Director was touting as being on the ‘cutting edge of educational practices’. ISReviews, to the contrary, painted an accurate picture of every classroom, across all grade levels, teaching in lock-step from a textbook–a photocopied, ancient textbook, at that!

Last week we heard from teacher who told us he attended a school’s presentation at the recruiting fair and was immensely impressed with the school’s size, architectural presence and resources. Consulting ISR he discovered the photos were of a local university that rents a small wing of one building to a local enterprise that call this space an ‘International School’.  He passed on the offer.

ISReviews are rife with reports of schools that don’t make their payroll, or don’t procure work visas for  teachers, who then find themselves working illegally in a country where they could be jailed if discovered. Worse yet are those that switch-up contracts upon a teacher’s arrival, withdraw health benefits and/or suddenly expect teachers to share housing. The list goes on and on.

There are a great many schools around the world that fulfill our expectations of what the international teaching experience should be. But, as with every industry, there are imposters with financially-oriented motives who masquerade as the real thing, waiting to ensnare the uninformed. International Schools Review hopes our efforts will spare you that experience.

Has ISR helped you avoid a landmine? Has ISR helped you step into a rewarding International teaching situation? We invite you to share your experiences!

2 Responses to Has ISR Helped You Make a Wise Decision?

  1. Anonymous says:

    ISR has definitely helped me in avoiding bad schools. I wish more teachers reviewed their schools, good and bad, to help others in the future.

    Like

  2. Happy says:

    I’m glad you posted this topic. I’ve worked at three great schools and two dreadful schools. ISR didn’t exist when I landed at the two dreadful places. It was great that in the very early days of ISR I was able to read a couple of reviews of my third possible school and give the place a pass. Over the years as the reviews rolled in my decision to avoid the place was validated by the awful reviews posted.

    I relied on ISR again last recruiting season and read reviews of schools I had an interest in, well in advance of the fair. When I interviewed with a sleazeball I had read about on ISR I could see the traits revealed about this guy were right on. When he asked me if I was in a relationship I instantly knew from the reviews that what he was asking was “are you available”? I told him I was not in a relationship. I could see the spark n his eyes. I was later offered the job and invited to dinner at the same time. I declined both offers. I have fantasized about possible snide responses I could have made to the offer but didn’t.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s