Teacher Fired for Confronting Bully Issue

bully50259047After watching one of her students blow his nose on other students, push them down and call them inappropriate names, Nicole LeMire, a fifth-grade teacher at Glen Oak Elementary in Ohio, decided to discuss the incident in her classroom. She addressed the bully by saying, “Do you know how your actions and words are hurting other students and your friends?” From her own account of the situation, “That is all I said.”

It was after the bully’s parents reported the discussion that the school board claimed LeMire had displayed poor judgment in trying to resolve the incident. The board fired her at an open meeting in front of her supporters. District Assistant Superintendent Linda Martin said, “By encouraging an entire classroom of students to bully this one student, LeMire had gone too far.”

Dorothy Espelage, professor of educational philosophy at The University of Illinois is an expert on bullying. She tells us that publicly confronting a bully is exactly what teachers should be doing – “We want teachers to have an open conversation about bullying in their classrooms.” She stresses, at the beginning of the school year teachers should talk to their students about creating a class atmosphere that says We do NOT accept bullying.

Are we, as teachers, expected to turn a blind eye to bullying? Are we supposed to pretend we just didn’t witness bullying? What message would such actions have on the victims of bullying? If bullied kids don’t feel supported, then what? The incident that led to Nicole LeMire loosing her job took place in the United States, a country that presents itself as a land of laws and procedures. Transpose this incident to a country where wealthy parents intimidate school directors and manipulate legal systems to yield to their demands, and LeMire could well have found herself imprisoned, or worse!

A Google search for Nicole LeMire will bring up many newspaper and magazine articles on this event.

Comments / Blog

41 Responses to Teacher Fired for Confronting Bully Issue

  1. Anonymous says:

    It’s a very sad day when a teacher cannot reprimand a student for doing something inappropriate. Teachers are not shaming students by doing so, sometimes you need to get a grip. I find this younger generation particularly the x and y are so PC, that being friends with their children is what life is all about. Sorry, you are the adult, you make the rules. You take responsibility for your children’s behaviour. A teacher should be able to teach, not have to worry about so and so doing ridiculous things in the classroom. Perhaps parents should be made to sit in classes with their nuisance children and see what goes on.
    Teaching is not an easy job we don’t get paid a heap, what profession works the day and does duty, and takes work home, works overtime at meetings, makes their own resources etc etc.

    Like

  2. Anonymous says:

    A few years ago I arrived in a Middle Eastern country placed in an international school with international kids and teachers. My immediate colleagues so I found out, bullied the previous 2 teachers from the same home country as my own ( I am a westerner, pale ,blue eyes, brunette). This bullying took place over 2 years, one teacher had a break down and flew back home, the other one was placed in a sister school. Why, you have to ask when the team members clearly had an issue with staff from this country, would they do it again?

    Of course I did not know of this until I started asking questions. At first I thought it was me, then as time evolved it became quite apparent that these 2 staff members in particular were well known for their bullying tactics.

    Sadly as is often the case with bullies they enticed and entangled other team members into their web. Approaching the management about this issue, was met with a variety of statements none of which will be new to any of you, such as; I didn’t know anything like that was going on; no I had no idea that’s why those teachers left; I had thought that, but had no hard evidence; that’s the first I have heard of this; what do you want me to do; this isn’t true I know these teachers they are the salt of the earth; you must be mistaken etc etc.

    I sort out the CEO, once again words that will not be new to you; I have not heard of this before, this didn’t happen, you must be mistaken.

    Unlike the teacher being fired I chose to leave as the new kid on the block must surely be deluded and imaging such things. My replacement lasted 5 school days, did the school do anything NO and to this day they have not.

    Still, being prepared to stand up for yourself in international education does not do you any good. schools for profit are just that, make a profit at all costs, teachers are a commodity, someone else will come along and fill the slot.

    Unions are a great thing, they would sort these schools and their owners out once and for all.

    I can stand with my head held high, but it comes with a price tag, lack of quality employment.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    Amanda Todd is the name of a girl who was bullied at school in Canada. She committed suicide. I’m sure many of you know of this story, and how it came about that Amanda was in the position of being constantly bullied. Amanda’s mom courageously continues to work with organizations which will help kids learn and understand what bullying is.

    Many schools do have programs for helping students understand what bullying is, and learning how to cope with it. There are many schools who do believe in zero tolerance.

    Like some teachers who commented here, I do not need to know about Nicole LeMire’s personnel file to form a judgement of her actions towards stopping the bullying from continuing in her classroom. It is a logical fallacy (argumentum ad hominum, actually) to blame the person for the situation. Judge her choice of actions in the situation she was in, and stick to that, because if you don’t, you might as well continue along the logical fallacy that because LeMire had done something in her past, this would have caused the bully to act out in class. Can you see how silly that argument is? That would mean that whatever we do in our past would cause our students to decide to behave a certain way. There is no logical connection, here. The administrators were trying to deflect pressure off of themselves by digging up dirt on the teacher – a great way to distract us from the main issue.

    It seems to me that LeMire was trying to address the situation by getting the students talking about bullying. Whether or not she did so skillfully, she was trying to address the bullying. Rather than firing her, the admin. could have addressed the actual issue with the students, and supported this teacher. I can think of many ways that they could have done this, including talking to the student and the kids who felt bullied alone to teach them how to “use their words” appropriately, getting a school counsellor involved, or beginning a class or a school No Bullying Program going. They could have had a team meeting with the teacher, the child, the admin, and the parents to help open up discussions. I think the parents were in some denial about their child, and probably needed something like this because they, themselves probably didn’t know how to address how to manage their own child’s need to lash out angrily at others (for whatever reason it was happening).

    Bullying can seriously hurt children. It is a form of violence. Teachers need to receive support from senior teachers and staff members in order to deal with this issue.

    For that matter, bullying amongst staff happens too, and can drive a teacher to leave their job. (Ironically, seems like LeMire was bullied out of her job). We all know about this, but we don’t talk about it, do we? It is as if adults are supposed to be immune to this unfair pressure, but we feel all the same feelings as children do when we receive bullying at work. But that is a different topic for a different ISR discussion.

    I wish the best to LeMire. At least she can say that she has left this job (by choice or not) by trying to do the right thing for the students whom, she felt, were being unfairly harassed, and by trying to help the child who was acting out confront his or her own issues. Good for you, LeMire. It took courage.

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  4. Dr. Barbara Spilchuk says:

    I understand that this article has been raised so that International Teachers can consider the repercussions of this type of behaviour occurring in a school in a foreign country. Unfortunately, I have been involved in many international cases where parents who are well connected have bullied teachers for better marks or for having disciplined their children. (Please read Katherine’s story). I have also observed parents attempting to bully school administration for issues like schedules that infringe upon the parents’ ability to show up with their children whenever they want and leave whenever they want or for examinations that may be too difficult for their children.
    Bullying crosses borders and continents and is painful for everyone concerned. Even in North America where there are strong teacher unions, I have observed bullying occurring student to student, student to teacher, parent to teacher, parent to administration and administration to teacher. Bullying is a pervasive and insidiously dangerous behaviour wherever it is found and I take it very seriously.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    She should have addressed the student’s parents before addressing the entire class or brought the troublemaker to the principle’s office. She is an educator.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I disagree. One must respond . If the kid was being punched would we have waited to tell the parents. No we would have stopoed it first. If the child was being called obscene racist names would we have waited. No we would have stepped in and stopped it.

      Like

  6. Janet says:

    It is wrong to publish this teachers personal and confidential file as she has no course of redress. In the meantime the toe -rag of a pupil who was exhibiting the obnoxious, anti social behaviour is not named and shamed! If the child felt ‘humiliated’ for being made to face the consequences of his behaviour then tough! His parents should also have been shamed of his behaviour and done something other than complaining about the teachers actions! So, let’s look at the learning outcomes of this ‘lesson’. Outcome 1: If you are made to feel responsible as a result of your actions then this is unacceptable! Outcome 2: You must complain about being made to feel responsible to someone else, after all it’s not your fault! Outcome 3: The person who made you face the consequences is removed from the position where they can hold you accountable for further displays of similar behaviour! Outcome 4: You learn that being obnoxious is rewarded.
    I wonder if the Superintendent of the area has an education background and spent time at the ‘chalk face’? From her comments and actions I suspect not!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Interesting that you presume the child guilty and want him named and shamed, whereas you want the adult (the professional, the one paid to provide education and care for all children) to be presumed innocent and have her confidentiality respected.

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      • Janet says:

        Actually I didn’t say I wanted him named and shamed I said the teacher had a right to confidentially! I also said it was right that he should be made to face the consequences of his actions. From what I understand, the child’s actions had been documented ,and are not just ‘hear say’. It’s because I keep in mind that all my pupils have a right to learn in a safe environment, that I believe the actions of one child cannot be allowed to disrupt that.

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    • Anon says:

      When I read descriptors like “toe-rag” or “dirt-bag” or Spilchuk advocating year-long exclusion, I despair of our profession. This is an eleven year old we are talking about. Will you stop thinking like a Fox News broadcaster and remember you are educators!

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  7. Not Dead Yet! says:

    All I can say is that I am happy to be retiring in 22 days. I will miss the kids. But I certainly won’t miss the constant threat of this kind of situation, in the U.S. or abroad. I taught an equal number of years in both situations, and there is always a threat.
    Even if this particular teacher had some problems, we all know of good teachers who were vilified by some snot-nosed brat and his/her parents.
    If you want me, I’ll be poolside with my books and sanity.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Good on you and happy retirement. I am looking forward to my retirement in 18 months time. Back in Australia now, after five years overseas teaching, and I can’t believe how much ‘the rights of the child’ have reversed the table on adult/teacher’s authority and leadership. Even with Union support we need to watch our backs and mouths, not that that is a bad thing but the spontaneity and fun has gone out of teaching for me. Good luck

      Like

  8. Anonymous says:

    Read the article that gives both sides of the story, and that quotes Espelage as saying she doesn’t know what happened, maybe the teacher went too far. Students were crying and at least one ran out of the room.
    Holding a student accountable, that’s fine. Public shaming and humiliation of a student? I can’t approve. There is a difference.

    Like

  9. Anonymous says:

    You can also probably imagine how this all started; A threat from the parents that they would sue the school district if the teacher wasn’t fired or disciplined for hurting their child’s feelings. Poor baby! Bullys come from bullys and I have seen this so many times. In today’s law suit happy environment and politically motivated leadership types, that’s all it would take to get a teacher fired. You could be the best teacher on the planet, with a stellar record of academic achievement in your students, but if a parent threatens to sue, you are done. And parents like these count on that. They tell the superintendent to jump and she says, “how high?”.With the loss of union protection and tenure in the US, even good teachers have nothing to back them up anymore. Is it any wonder that nearly every survey of recent college graduates shows an all-time low in the number of young people that want to be teachers? Furthermore, does anyone find it surprising that these days the overwhelming majority of young teachers that go into teaching out of college leave the profession after an average of less than 5 years? My own mother has watched the teaching profession fall to rockbottom in the 15 years I have been teaching and listened to me when I talk about all that we are subjected to. I lost count of the number of times she has told me I should walk away from teaching and do something else. The problem is that teaching is in my blood. It is who I am and I’ll be damned if I let these political worms drive me out of it. There is nothing else I could see myself doing as a career. It is my calling. I am here for the kids and to help them become better people & good, productive members of society. The Good? I have many that are now grown adults, who send me Birthday wishes, holiday cards and thank me for what I did for them, even all these years later. The bad? I have paid a high price for my devotion to my students and their welfare. Both personally and professionally. Unfortunately, I am not unique in this. So may of us have had the same experiences at the hands of people who have no business being in leadership positions. I hope it changes back to the old ways again one day.

    Like

  10. Anonymous says:

    Wow………. Something is a miss here. Besides the BIG issue she given an official notice for talking to someone about something that happened at work that was not a board employee and for leaving her room. I am over the moon that l do not work in her district. This seems like an exercise in eliminating a person of interest and catering to the squeaky wheel than engaging in professional mediation.

    Like

  11. mlesurf says:

    If this was my record, you wouldn’t have to fire me. I’d quit.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ls1p4l19ezfxnvr/201505151553%2001.pdf?dl=0

    This teacher has been given warnings and second chances as well as attempts to support her that have been ignored. I am all in favour of supporting good teachers. I am also in favour of not supporting bad teachers. Not everyone who teaches is a good teacher.

    Like

  12. Brad says:

    Read the personnel file- It sounds like she was an incompetent teacher with a big mouth, rather than a champion against school bullying.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Brad,

      Your key words here are “sounds like”. You formed an opinion from her personnel file. Keep in mind that administrators are professionals at manipulating facts and making someone appear incompetent, if they feel like doing so. The have expert skills in writing reports designed to make a teacher look bad and they have the power of their position to back them up. Because they are the boss, their word is usually final and accepted as fact. I have seen this too many times and been the victim of such tactics myself. I would never take an admin’s assessment of a teacher at face value. Besides, even if she did have some issues in the past, she did what she should have done and confronted the little dirtbag kid. He should have been embarrassed and made to feel like a fool in front of his peers and maybe even been forced to let the kids he blew his nose on do the same to him, in public. Maybe then he might have really learned a lesson in proper behavior and consequences. I also consider the fact that there is never a perfect way to handle a situation like this. No matter what you do, someone will cry foul and complain about how the teacher handles it. The point is that it needed to be done and someone needed to act immediately to stop this kid. She did the right thing, even if she didn’t do it 100% correctly. And what message does this send to other teacher that might have been likely to act? They will probably now do nothing to stop bullying, fearing for losing their jobs as well. Good job, Linda Martin.

      Like

      • Wizzy says:

        @ Anon, very true. I would like to the school district and observe the teachers and review the lesson plans from the teachers who are in good standing.

        Like

  13. Ray says:

    Working near the district in question, the incident has been in the news a lot lately. It seems, from documented evidence, that the district had just cause for firing the teacher in question.

    The district’s response:
    http://www.olentangy.k12.oh.us/15104-2/

    The teacher’s personnel file, which is public record:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ls1p4l19ezfxnvr/201505151553%2001.pdf?dl=0

    Of course, the answer may be somewhere in the middle. However, I’d be cautious not to make a martyr of someone who may not deserve it.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Thank you for sharing this. It is misleading to say she was fired because of confronting a bully. She has a history of not following the school policy and this was her last chance.

      Like

    • Dr. Barbara Spilchuk says:

      It is inappropriate for the teacher’s personnel file to be published or even to be of public record. This is a professional file. Where is her union in all of this?

      Like

  14. anonymous says:

    Not to do with bullying but rather poor management at my international school in Egypt. A 2nd grade colleague of mine was suspended without pay for a week for emailing his student’s parents asking them to speak to their children about their behaviour in specialist lessons. This happened a few days ago after the parents caused uproar over the ‘disrespect’ of his polite and professional email. As teachers we can’t believe the response of the management or the parents, its hard to know what course of action to take sometimes, is it better to look out for the children or should we just be looking to cover our own backs especially in a foreign country.

    Like

  15. Dr. Barbara Spilchuk says:

    This child has learned to bully from parents who are enabling his behaviour. This superintendent has further enabled the bullying by supporting parents who will continue to support this bully behaviour because they have not been called to account for it! Incredible! Instead of punishing the teacher, when the parents complained, the superintendent should have insisted that these parents home-school their child for the rest of the year to ensure that they and the child learn, together, how to treat others properly and take responsibility for their actions before the child returns to school.

    Like

    • Winsome Loraine Peter says:

      Dr Spilchuk, thank you for this excellent post! I agree 100%. You are absolutely right. The child should have been removed from the school and taught to be accountable for his/her behavior and actions and how to treat others. If this child grows up and starts bullying in the workplace, I don’t think his/her boss is going to tolerate this. Children’s behavior and conduct are shaped from childhood and one can see it played out in their adulthood. One online article said that so many of the school’s parents, students and teachers were in tears after the vote was taken to fire this teacher. We should start a petition in support for Nicole LeMire.

      Like

    • Allan says:

      Unfortunately what should and what actually happens is very different in everyday life. The school board are probably all bully types as well and condone the actions of the school yard bully and the sniveling parents!

      Like

    • mlesurf says:

      I think it is important to get all the facts before passing judgement. Reading the personnel file there is a history of this teacher acting inappropriately and not communicating effectively. This teacher has been fired for one more offence when she had been given multiple warnings and support. Sometimes teachers are in the wrong.

      Like

    • Anonymous says:

      What nonsense you write. Of course we should not tolerate poor behavior from children, but if you think that the first step response from a school superintendent in an instance like this should be the exclusion of an 11 year old child for the rest of the school year then I think you’re in need of some help as well.

      Like

      • Dr. Barbara Spilchuk says:

        I am concerned about all of the children in this situation including the bully. I am also concerned about the parents of the bully. As a principal, I once asked a set of parents to remove their child from my school when they, the parents, could not understand the value of their child’s good citizenship in my school, and the value of their own good citizenship within the school community. When I did this, all of the partner schools in my community refused entry to this child. The parents were then forced to put the child into an Off-Campus Program for a year so that they and their child could learn the value of positive community behaviour in a small school remedial setting. Student behaviour is monitored,reinforced and educated through partnership in a school and the parents must play a strong role within that partnership. Please go online and read “Bully In Sight” by Tim Field to find out what the repercussions can be later on in life when schools do not take a hard line when it comes to bullying in schools.

        Like

        • Anonymous says:

          Dr Spilchuk, I think I’ve dealt with more situations like this in my career than you have, and I am familiar with all of the books (and all of the media frenzy) surrounding this subject. Of course there ought to be consequences for students who misbehave and of course parents must be involved in any disciplinary response – but to exclude an 11 year old child for the entire year? Frankly, I think you do the profession no favors by encouraging a hasty and thoughtless “off with his head” reaction and thereby feeding the hysteria that surrounds “bullying”.

          Like

  16. Anonymous says:

    ABSOLUTELY SICKENING! The Superintendent should be fired by the school board for HER actions. This is a perfect example of why I left teaching in the US and went abroad. In the US, administrators have their heads up their backsides in so many ways, I have lost count. They make foolish, politically-motivated, self-serving decisions that only make situations worse and chase the very best teachers out of the profession or to another country. It’s too bad someone higher up doesn’t have the nerve to come to Ms. Lemire’s assistance and reverse the decision to fire her. Something like this shouldn’t even be allowed. A summary termination should not be legal. This is one of the many sad consequences of also getting rid of tenure and union power in the US. People like Linda Martin have too much power and can ruin the career of a good teacher on their own whim.

    Linda Martin should be dragged in front of the parents of that school district in chains and given 50 lashes. HOW DARE she support a bully and his parents in such a way. She has given a clear message that anyone who confronts such inhuman behavior will be the one who pays for it, not the child. His parents should also be given 100 lashes each for raising such a piece of crap and then defending him by complaining to the district. Had I, or most any child of my generation, done such a thing, our parents would have beaten the daylights out of us after hearing about it from the teacher.

    Ms. Lemire should have been applauded for taking a stand and teaching this kid a lesson that his parents obviously failed to. All this garbage about protecting the child’s self-esteem over keeping the kids he bullies safe, is only producing a generation of sociopathological miscreants that know full well there will never be any real consequences for behaving in such unacceptable ways. When I was a kid, parents would have flocked to the assistance of Ms. Lemire and gotten her reinstated, then fired the superintendent or at least had sanctions placed on her. Until there is a HUGE philosophical change in the American education system and it gets rid of people like Linda Martin, it will continue to degrade, just as it has been for the last 20 years. Time to get it together, rewind the clock 25 years and bring back the old ways.

    I am going into my third year teaching abroad and while it may not be perfect, I am far happier teaching outside the US. I myself was victimized by administrators with their own agenda, so I feel deeply for Ms. Lemire and wish her all the best of luck. Come teach abroad, Nicole, and let the American system continue to rot from the head down.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      These type of incidents are NOT restricted to the USA, it happens all over the world and I blame the little shits we call bunny huggers, who got rid of school discipline and who cannot take being disciplined for doing something wrong and who do not discipline their own children as their offspring are little angels and cannot do any wrong!

      Like

    • mlesurf says:

      How can you suggest public whipping and complain about bullying in the same paragraph?

      Do you not see the problem with that?

      Like

      • Anonymous says:

        A public whipping and bullying are completely different things and you are comparing apples & oranges. The same standard does not apply to whipping & bullying. The superintendent made a decision based upon her own agenda, not because the teacher really deserved to be fired. As such, and for acting in such a way, overtly abusing her power, she should be punished severely. She has only made the bullying problem worse. In a school, bullying is when a student pushes others around via mental or physical abuse. Their behavior is considered generally unacceptable by the public and should be dealt with. The bully should have consequences, not the teacher. So maybe she had some problems in her personnel file, but this should not have gotten the teacher fired. What I do see a problem with is that you somehow connected these two things and have shifted the focus away from this fool of a superintendent and her actions. I suggested a harsh punishment for her, because someone needs to put a stop to administrators doing things like this and getting away with it. Perhaps if there were actual consequences, like a public whipping, for admins that do such things, they would think twice before rending a teacher’s career for their own reasons. Remember, the teacher had many supporters at the hearing and the superintendent brushed them aside.

        Like

  17. Enno Pranger says:

    This story is hard to believe, I assume there will be another side of the story as well. Is there no job protection at all like teachers unions or court in the US? Very sad story if it is true.

    Like

  18. Winsome Loraine Peter says:

    Very sad indeed! But then again I am not surprised – educational institutions the west have made every excuse not to discipline students. I feel very sad for Nicole Lemire. This bully may grow up to be a murderer or a rapist – if he is arrested, he’ll get a lawyer to defend him and prove his innocence and then he will walk free to do whatever he pleases to others because he will have his mind programmed that he has done no wrong.

    As an international teacher, I have never turned a blind eye to bullying, in fact as soon as I identify it, I alert the principal or school counselor or the head of my department – I have always got their support. And I make it very clear to all my students, that in my classes, absolutely no bullying is allowed. I do not tolerate it at all. I have never had an issue with correcting a bully and I have seen that once you correct this malfunctioning behavior and conduct, it stops, once and for all. And with time, both the bully and victims become friends and are able to get along.

    I think Nicole Lemire should consider working abroad – she will have no problems disciplining a bully in Asia.or Africa.

    Like

    • “I think Nicole Lemire should consider working abroad – she will have no problems disciplining a bully in Asia.or Africa.”

      This tells me that you are taking a very narrow view of what happens in Asia and Africa. There may be some schools where this wouldn’t be an issue–there are many where it is. Plus, there are no protections in place if a connected parent comes after the teacher. It doesn’t take long looking through reviews and message board posts to see all kinds of situations where privileged students get to push the boundaries of what is acceptable in international schools.

      While the original story may have happened as is told here in a brief blurb, I’ve never worked in a US district that would have had an issue with the situation as described. Plus, unless the teacher works at a charter, she could have had union protection.

      In the US, there is a huge amount of time spent on addressing bullying and the numbers of kids who report being bullied are dropping nationally. The other side of the coin is that kids are now tattle tales on a level that I haven’t experienced ever. I guess that it’s better than bullying, but not a lot.

      If you are somehow saying that bullies predominantly reside in the US because American schools have ignored the situation, you are misinformed. The hyperbole of this kid turning into a murderer or a rapist is a US characteristic though–you haven’t escaped as much as you think that you have.

      Like

      • Anonymous says:

        Ned,

        Unions and their power to protect teachers has all but been eliminated in the US. I watched as tenure was taken away as well. There is absolutely no job security, or any real protection, for teachers in the states anymore. You can lose your job in the blink of an eye and for doing nothing more than disagreeing with your boss. While it’s not much different abroad, at least you have some options. Schools and admins in the US will also blacklist teachers that they don’t like for personal reasons and get away with it. That’s alot harder to do in the international world. I was put through a ton of crap by admins who had their own agendas and didn’t like me for their own reasons, so I know what it’s like. Even in New York City, where I had a very strong union, I almost lost my job for nothing more than getting injured and needing surgery to fix it. My Principal had his own reasons for disliking people with my heritage and co-opted other admins to make me look bad. And the union did almost nothing. Now imagine if I had been in a “right-to-work” state, where so-called unions have no true power or collective bargaining ability. They should be called “right-to-be-unemployed” states. But that’s another posting……..

        Like

      • Winsome Loraine Peter says:

        Dear Captian Ned,

        I spent the last 15 years working in Singapore, Malaysia, China and Kazakhstan – I have taught students from 29 nationalities thus far so I have made a substantial contribution to the education of students from all over the globe. I applaud the Asian systems of education. I am a South African citizen and at least we have the South African Democratic Teachers Union who will no doubt defend our teachers if they are fired for bully issues like the Nicole Lemire case. In comparison, the western systems like those in the US are a poor show of how educated professionals are treated. Where is the union protection for US teachers?

        This is why I and many other civilised and cultured professionals prefer working in regions of the world, where we know this kind of student bullying will not be tolerated. I have never applied to teach in western countries like the US and will never in the future.

        Oh yes, there is bullying all over the world, but to date I have not heard a teacher get fired for correcting bully behaviour in an African or Asian country.If a second world or third world country had to fire a teacher for correcting a bully, then we can say the country is backward and their systems are still primitive. But the USA is supposed to be (in the eyes of the world) a first world, developed, highly advanced and progressive nation with the most sophisticated systems in place – and a teacher who corrects a bully (who is hurting and harming others) gets fired! How do you explain that!

        In South Africa, the bully’s parents would be called in and the bully will be expelled from the school.

        I fully agree with the Anonymous which starts his/her message with the words ‘Absolutely Sickening’!

        Like

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