Who’s Looking Out for Teachers at YOUR School?

January 26, 2017

looking-out-for-teachers-160670873-blog..Thanks to the many teachers who post in-depth School Reviews to ISR, we’re all well aware of which schools treat teachers right and which schools stoop to despicably low practices. The good news is, the majority of International Schools honor their Contracts and look out for their teachers!

..In schools that are focused on the well-being of their staff, Parent-Teacher Associations and faculty representatives to the Board are commonplace and give voice to teachers’ concerns. In many Reviews, teachers report that their PTA is quite effective. School Boards can also be beneficial when it comes to looking out for teachers. Embassies can be an ally.

..There are, however, schools that have banned Parent-Teacher Associations, and often times, school Boards are composed of local parents, many of whom will not speak out in defense of teachers for fear of retribution from an influential school owner. Reviews show that embassies may also be hesitant to get involved in looking out for teachers, even when Contracts have not been honored. This is probably because embassy employees need a place to school their children and don’t want to make waves.

..Ultimately, how teachers are treated appears to boil down to the attitude of a school owner and the Head of School. If an owner is driven by profits at all cost, and sees education as strictly a business, teachers suffer. At such schools, the only one looking out for teachers are the teachers themselves.

..International Schools are not static entities. They are regularly bought and sold, or taken over, by large management companies. This makes it important that you keep current on behind-the-scene dealings at schools you may be interested in. A change in management can mean no one is looking out for teachers, or hopefully, quite the opposite.

..ISR asks: Is YOUR school looking out for International Educators? Do you have a Parent/Teacher organization? Is it effective? Is the school Board responsive to teachers’ input? Could you depend on your embassy in a legal dispute, if needed? Or, is it every teacher for him/herself? If your school has banned Teacher Councils or Parent/Teacher organizations, ISR is a good place to spread the word!

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Please stick to the topic: Feel free to name your school. This Blog is expressly for sharing information on what schools are doing to look out for teachers. If you wish to otherwise Review your school, please submit a School Review.  


The Recruiting Fair Diaries

January 19, 2017

 

diary-148615604-350x350..Recruiting Fairs have been aptly described as intimidating, frustrating, exhilarating, a cattle call (sometimes accompanied by a choice expletive or two). Truth be known, no matter what you might think of Recruiting Fairs, they do remain one of the more sure-fire ways to land an International Teaching position.

..If you’re planning on attending a Recruiting Fair, a firm understanding of the intrinsic dynamics of the event is essential for success. There’s much more strategy involved in landing a job than simply lining up in front of a recruiter’s table and trying to talk your way into an interview. Knowing what to expect and having a game plan is essential for success.

..Simply stated, what you need, going into a Recruiting Fair, is foresight. To help our readers get the edge, ISR invites you to read teachers’ day-by-day, blow-by-blow accounts of their Recruiting Fair experiences. Such an inside look at Recruiting Fairs is essential if YOU want to hit the ground running and walk out with the prize!

2016 Fair Diaries
Search Melbourne,  ISS Bangkok,  Search Bangkok,  

2017 Fair Diaries
Newbie thoughts on London Fair
Search LondonUpdates from Bangkok More Fair Diaries

Must-Read Articles for Recruiting Candidates
Tips to Make Recruiting a Success!
Recruiting 101 for Newbies

Ask Question, Get Answers From Colleagues
Everything You Want to Know About Recruiting


Foreign Students in Trump’s America

January 12, 2017


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As International Educators, many of our students will be affected by American President-elect Trump’s threat to enact a ban on Muslims entering the US, and to further impose strict vetting standards on immigrants from countries he considers “exporters of terrorism.”

..Early in his campaign, Trump called for the elimination of the J-1 Exchange Visa program through which foreign students can work in the US. It is not known if he was referring to the J-1 program as a whole or only to the jobs portion. It should be noted that colleges also use the J-1 Visa to bring in visiting foreign scholars.

..Philip Altbach, a research professor and founding director of the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College, believes the new President will deter foreign students from considering US schools and that it will be more difficult for students who do apply. Mr. Altbach goes on to say he believes the outcome will be that Australia, Canada and other countries, where English is the medium of instruction, will benefit as students direct their applications to countries other than the US. He said the UK is “likely to be in the same situation as the US as it is seen as unwelcoming to foreigners.”

..The number of international students in US colleges is calculated to be more than one million. The Middle East alone sends more than 100,000 students to US universities.  A foreign student applying to universities in California said: “In his campaign, he’s discriminating against Muslim and other brown and black people ….. I’m thinking of applying to Canada“. Another student is quoted: “It’s the main topic of conversation among my friends, ….. They don’t want to apply to the US under Trump“.

ISR Asks: If your students, apprehensive to apply to a US university, asked for your advice, what would  you say to them? Has your school/colleagues met to discuss this topic? If so, what was concluded?

 


Watching From a Distance

January 5, 2017

overseas-away-from-politics-146833220-newesletter
..When you live overseas for extended periods of time, events in your home country tend to impact you differently than if you were actually living there. Immersed in an exotic culture quite different from your own, it’s not uncommon to feel buffered, even exempt, from consequences of political events currently shaping your homeland.

  For example, recent US elections and BREXIT rocked the world. For better or worse, for or against, watching these events unfold from a distant land most likely lessened their immediate impact on Americans and Europeans living abroad. In some ways it’s natural to feel exempt from the current political goings-on back home as the people and landscapes that surround us envelop our lives in a different reality entirely.

  Without debating, boosting or bashing the merits of the US election or BREXIT, ISR asks: How do you, as an expat, respond emotionally to major political events back home? Are you glad to be far away from their impact and living a (hopefully) less stressful life, or are you frustrated you can’t be there experiencing and vociferously participating in person? Although you may be thousands of miles from home, do such events have noticeable consequences on your overseas career? How do YOU feel about watching events unfold in your home country from a distance?

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