“Check Your Own Damn Privilege”

Minimizing the Influence of Wokeness and Identity Politics
at International Schools Worldwide

The following Article does not reflect the views of ISR. Written and submitted by an ISR site member who requested anonymity, we open the following Article to discussion.

The Coddling of the American Mind by Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukinoff outlines three great untruths in their seminal book that have stunted university students in the last several years. The first untruth is that whatever does not kill you makes you weaker. The second is that your feelings should always be trusted and validated. The final untruth is that life is a morality struggle between good and evil.

Coming of age in the 1980s and1990s when political correctness first began, I recall that phase as being primarily instigated by administrators at universities. A few students were involved, but most were indifferent. Now political correctness has gone into hyperdrive, and a minority of vocal students are now demanding that they be protected from other people who see the world differently. Think of all the terminology and ideas associated with the illiberal desire to demand conformity to certain ideas: social justice, wokeness, identity politics, critical race theory, intersectionality, equitable spaces, safe spaces, triggering, trigger warning, microaggressions, cancel culture. The list goes on and on…..

The ideas they bring with them are starting to affect all institutions, but international schools in particular have been disproportionately affected. The result is inevitable: emotional excess, moral vanity and exhibitionism, and avoidable conflicts that should be molehills but become mountains because of the greater proclivity for younger teachers to seek out reasons to be outraged and offended.

Does your lunchroom have young teachers who feel the need to correct the language that others use? Are you or your students taught to adopt identity politics, which means the most important thing about you is your race and gender? Are there ideological litmus tests where one must accept these ideas at trainings and seminars? Have you ever been afraid to speak out against a policy that seems wrong to you but has been justified under the guise of diversity, equity and inclusion?

All ideas have a heritage and a past. These ideas have an unseemly past, rooted in two major schools of thought. The first is Marxism, which was supposed to usher in a grand new age in the 20th century, only to fail in every single culture across the planet and lead to, oh let’s see here, over 100 million deaths. It seems that the suffering and failure that Marxism produced has not changed its adherence from many intellectuals, even though one would think these people are supposed to care about empirical realities.

The second school is postmodernism. I remember being attracted to this worldview at first, because it seems to offer a view of freedom and emancipation from old assumptions. But that’s not what postmodernism is. Postmodernism, rather, is the believe that we are nothing more than representations of power of our unchosen groups (race and gender), and life is nothing more than a power struggle, as there is no other reality to the world than power.

These ideas have stunted the emotional and intellectual development of a whole generation of students, and now many of these younger students have now entered the workforce and seek to impose the worldview they learned in college on the rest of society, and of course, international schools.

They are not appealing or accurate ideas. They have a lot of surface appeal, but it does not take much time to see these ideas inevitably lead to a totalitarian dystopia They represent all of reality in a two-dimensional (dare I say binary?) way where there are only good people and bad people, and all people should think of themselves as merely a member of a group in order to be considered “good.” At a time in their lives when their own personal development is so critical, students are now taught that who they are doesn’t matter; feeling the right way and settling for the role as victim.

To the extent that my views are political, I am doing nothing more than impugning and insulting the totalitarian left, because a world without free speech, free expression and individualism can never be compromised, both at international schools or anywhere else. As educators, open and free inquiry and self-expression have to be the cornerstones of our practice, free from ideological and social coercion.

Any argument that this article promotes white nationalism in the slightest is libelous. But I expect and welcome strong dissent to what is written here. I am challenging the core beliefs of many people, so I welcome criticism.

But can I make a request? Please, pretty please, with sugar on top, don’t proclaim your precious privilege. All of us are fortunate by almost any standard to have careers in international schools. But that is gratitude, not privilege. My experience is that those who proclaim their privilege are doing the following: aligning themselves with the oppressed on the cheap, proclaiming their moral superiority on that basis, and then using this unearned virtue as a means of telling other people what to do.

Which is why when I hear someone announce how privileged they are, I can only say, “You’re right.”

Anonymous author

Comments? Please scroll down to participate in the ISR Discussion Board

108 thoughts on ““Check Your Own Damn Privilege”

  1. This is a continuation of USA cultural colonialism/imperialism driven by woke activists who think everybody in the world should bow down to their particularly partial understanding of their own social and historical context. Yes, it has infected other countries to an extent, but the vast majority do not care for it and resent the imposition. That the USA is finding yet another way to dominate other cultures is actually profoundly offensive and culturally deaf.

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  2. Thanks to everyone’s comments thus far. It is fascinating to get everyone’s perspective.

    A few people expressed shock that ISR published this piece or that they wouldn’t give me a fair shake. ISR had no obligation to publish this piece, but they allowed me to use their platform to state positions that I suspect they personally reject, perhaps very deeply. So they have been more than fair to me, and they have set an example for open dialogue.

    I will not go through every accusation printed here. That would take too long.

    But I cannot defend myself from things I did not say.

    For other critics of the post, just because I say X, it does not follow that I also believe Y. If a black student being made fun of by Chinese students, or if gay students trying to reconcile their orientation within Egyptian culture, then every international teacher has a responsibility to remedy those situations, myself included. Of course.

    As far as being called a bigot….well, if rejecting the woke ideology on philosophical grounds makes me a bigot, that just demonstrates the intolerance that inspired this article in the first place.

    We don’t want to produce international school students who are brittle and shrill and hypersensitive. We want students who are tolerant of others and seeks to learn about the perspective of others. but also can handle problems as they come up, learn to tough things out, and devote themselves to pursuits that require true accomplishment and sacrifice.

    That is why woke ideology, with its mawkish grandstanding and excessive power grabs and disrespect for individual expression and free thought, should be rejected at international schools.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Very TOKish, and correct. Well balanced people and or teachers / students do not require to be told what to do or how to “speak” . Most likely the “Woke” fear most those who ignore them. By trying to stifle people with attacks, the people they attack eventually will have had enough and tell them off with common sense. The “Woke” need fear common sense above all else. This week I read someone trying to defend Meghan Markle’s comments about being married 3 days before the very expensive, globally viewed, legal wedding. Apparently if someone feels their experience is real, it must be the truth. It is not the place of any instructor to push their ideologies on their students. Open debate, looking at other viewpoints trumps wokenism. My use of “trumps” has no hidden meaning either, it just fit into the sentence.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. It has been sad (though not surprising) to see so many who disagree resorting to straightforward insults. Quite a few have been overtly unpleasant, which is concerning.

      I’m by no means an authority, but I do have degrees in both philosophy and English literature, which at least qualifies me to say that the accusations of bad writing and poor reasoning are obviously false from any sensible perspective. Those who claim not to see any value in what you have written, or who see you as morally deficient, are simply not engaging meaningfully at all. Which is a shame.

      Thanks for your thoughts and to ISR for upholding the values of free speech and critical thinking that we would hope mark the best of international education.

      Liked by 2 people

    3. ‘Yeah Hitler and the Nazis rejected WoKE options on their ideology. You are a racist.’

      I love this. Every word is beautifully bonkers. ‘Hitler and the Nazis’ is weepingly funny.

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    4. The most ‘brittle and shrill and hypersensitive’ students I have had have all been very conservative, right leaning kids. I had never witnessed real anti-semitism until I saw/heard it myself in the classroom. The same goes for severe homophobia and misogyny. Sadly, this was usually tolerated and protected by admin if it came from students of a certain religion or powerful, oligarch parents.

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  3. You want to leave politics out of the classroom???

    this is how the Stalinist commissar N. V. Krylenko responded to chess players in the Soviet Union who wanted to keep politics out of the game:

    We must finish once and for all with the neutrality of chess. We must condemn once and for all the formula “chess for the sake of chess,” like the formula “art for art’s sake.” We must organize shock-brigades of chess-players, and begin immediate realization of a Five-Year Plan for chess.

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    1. One sided politics . Being able to recognize, understand and tolerate another view has nothing to do with chess or USSR memes.

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    1. History has repeatedly shown us where the world will be when right wing ideology takes over. White supremacy means the murder of literally millions upon millions of non white people.

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  4. Why was this published? I’m not opposed to well-written articles presenting a viewpoint different to my own, but this is…something else. Were there no quality articles to add? It is just unsophisticated drivel of no substance. This site used to be better.

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    1. I believe that the author is trying to make several points about current mandatory thinking,. Instead making those points, the author is giving an (incomplete) background to where these ideas stem from. There is no need to re-state the entire “woke” ideology here. but for many teachers the slightest deviations from the “acceptable orthodoxy” of the woke is reminiscent of Stalinist and Maoist “re-education facilities” and the Maoist Red Guards. That is the climate many people with heterodox views are facing most certainly in academia/education, today’s mass media, and increasingly, in the corporate/business world. The issues are particularly problematic at the extreme spectrum of the ideology, and the shouters out there brook no deviation from the orthodoxy whatsoever. Do you really want to “decolonize STEM” Are you buying into the new language (they get that from Foucault and post modernists.. that language is power.. and for them it’s all about power differential.. you can never “punch down” and always “”punch up”. according to their intersectional power matrix of the oppressor and the oppressed (big elements of Marxism in here, class struggle, against “oppressive patriarchy and “”systemic racism”” of the cis white male”. Anyways to continue, do you really believe that equity means guaranteed same results and any disparities are proof of “systemic racism, in-equity””. Do you really believe that “silence is violence””. Do you really believe that your main job is to indoctrinate a classroom of “activists”” about the issues YOU feel are key/important?? – (A is for activisism, 1st graders!!) rather than support your students in the issues they feel engaged in and are important to them? The slightest dissent means your career will essentially be finished.

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  5. Asian American students are facing discrimination at American universities regarding admissions. This is having a huge impact on their lives and harms especially those that worked very hard to get higher scores than required but not high enough to overcome the discrimination quotas.
    This also harms other groups as now there are weaker students who will struggle and not find a good place where true talents could shine or weaknesses dealt with.
    Sadly a few high achieving talented minorities of certain skin color will be labelled as having been accepted only because of discrination and will not be accepted fully.
    The woke culture is being exposed over time and will burn out along with other similar Nazi like movements.

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  6. I read this twice. It is a bee in the bonnet article with no detail. I’m saying I agree of disagree, it’s just all thesaurus and no substance.

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  7. Thank you OP, this is the troll post of the century on ISR. A direct attack on neoliberal, tree hugging, recycled jumper wearing, lefty, ‘woke folk’. This reminds me of the heyday of the 00’s forums.

    Cleverly written, readable enough to get someone started, meandering enough to confuse and long enough to bore and frustrate. A classic troll post.

    And yet I disagree with it all. I’m not woke, never will be woke, shit, I am told I often come across initially as misogynistic until people listen properly and realise that I am trying to do my best for the community I lead.

    The world has changed and I think it is for the better. Go back 40 years and we identified people at school as being “a poof” or “not a poof”, it was third parties which had the honour of labelling people. The most popular in the school, deciding which minority group others belonged to through the use simple words.

    Yet here we are today, in a better world, where our young people no longer have to wait for the playground bully to decide if they are a poof or not, they can openly decide on their own label or pronouns.

    It makes me proud to hear young people in my care talk about how they identify with adults and their peers in an open and honest manner. I wish I had the courage to do the same as them.

    I give you 10/10 for your post and 10/10 for ISR publishing it, traffic to the site must be down if they are prepared to put this up.

    Advice for future posts – can you make sure you use more capitalised words and random capitals at the start of words mid sentence to highlight the outrage more.

    Good effort, OP. Well done.

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  8. Could not make it to the end of this pathetic screed. What a coward. He or she preaches about standing up against the evils of “woke culture,” yet is too spineless to even attach a name to this and take responsibility for the ideas.

    A molehill IS a mountain if you happen to be much smaller than the molehill. Instead of acknowledging differing perspectives from people with far less power and position, the author doggedly clings to the idea that the only valid perspective is his or her own. All this rage against so-called “woke” culture is nothing more than furious resentment that other people’s views are being given equal attention and recognition as valid, and that old views are being challenged and re-examined. Instead of having the moral courage to join other more open-minded people in a critical reassessment of old ideas and methods, the author would rather rail against progress, cling to old ideas and decry the involvement of new voices and new ideas in the shaping of social norms.

    The whole concept of “cancel culture” is meant to hold people accountable for their words and actions. In the old days it was simply called a boycott. It’s not a stretch to imagine the author calling Rosa Parks an SJW, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott “cancel culture run amok.” Thanks to social media, marginalized people can organize these types of economic protests immediately. All voices can finally be heard, and their economic power can be swiftly mobilized. The only people that should terrify are those who have something to gain by silencing them. If someone loses their job after a social media outcry, they aren’t being “cancelled.” That’s literally capitalism in action.

    Acknowledging the feelings of others as valid makes us human, not totalitarian liberals. Refusing to accept old ways of casually dismissing the feelings of marginalized people in favor of letting the privileged and powerful exclusively express THEIR thoughts and feelings is not the Marxist thought police. We are making room at the table for all voices to finally be heard. Refusing to welcome us makes you nothing more than a weak-minded cafeteria bully who puts his or her bag on an empty seat and snarls, “You can’t sit here.”

    Shame on ISR for publishing this garbage. To be fair, you should allow someone else to publish a rebuttal.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Well, I read the OP and agreed with some of it and disagreed with some of it, noted that it was respectful and reasonable. Then I read you calling the OP ‘pathetic’, ‘a coward’, ‘spineless’, ‘furious’, ‘resentful’, ‘lacking moral courage’, ‘closed minded, ‘raging’, ‘weak minded’, ‘a bully’, ‘snarling’ and writing ‘garbage’ and, with the best will in the world, I just don’t want to know you, to listen to you, or to take you seriously. I’m sad about that.

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  9. As a black educator, I am also worried about the monster that is wokeness and this obsession with race and identity politics. If sane people don’t get ahold of this, we will suffer. Thank you for writing this, and thank you ISR for publishing it. While these people will surely want this article deleted and its author cancelled, we must resist the urge to fall into their trap.

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    1. Keelah Rose Calloway- You said, “The whole concept of “cancel culture” is meant to hold people accountable for their words and actions. In the old days it was simply called a boycott.” That is not happening as much as you want to believe. Cancel culture has been used to try and silence and shame people with different opinions about topics. It is being used to punish people, not “hold them accountable.”

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    1. I think this took courage to write and it is sad that we have come to such a point where people are afraid to express their opinions for the fear that they evoke the wrath of others or the label of racism. It is a piece worthy of thought. It is important to consider alternative views and it is important to stand up against racism and it is important to recognize when we are censoring people merely by shutting down alternative opinions. Anyone who knows me would know how hard I fight against prejudice of any kind and yet I know and fear that pushing send could incur the wrath of people willing to judge me for standing up for someone’s right to express his or her opinion.

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  10. Enjoyed the post. I remember working in the original PC days as well and while I believed it was in our best interests to respect all students and staff for who they were, much of that actually ended up being lopsided and destructive in some schools. It was ok to have any sexual orientation, as long as you weren’t a male athlete in school ( they were looked down upon). The police who volunteered on many occasions would get the “eye rolls”. In short, the school community seemed to suffer and became divided and not that satisfying a place to work. Fast forward and numerous overseas posts working in wealthy Theocratic ruled Countries, Democratic City States, Socialist Island Paradise to the Pearl Delta area and I formulated an extensive “brand of one idea”. This idea helped me. Besides that idea, it also became easy to work in most environments when you maintain your own professionalism, respect the professionalism of those you work with and respect the “Host Country”. There would be bumps along the way, but in an international community one could always seem to arrive and find a group to hang out with much easier than moving to a new local in North America. While overseas I realized that many of the people I worked with were realistic and down to earth. I tended to avoid the lunch room, one reason to work in warm climates. I also understood many of those in North America or elsewhere who had socialist/left leaning ideas may have never lived or even set foot in a Socialist Country. Never experienced what democracy isn’t. My ‘brand of idea” was to borrow a Larry Bird trash talk quote when confronted with a person(s) who were more interested in their own ideals as opposed to promoting a positive school culture. Larry would be able to get into the heads of rookies by saying : you’re a rookie, what do you know”? I may not have said it out loud very often, and never really had to, said it to myself a bit more. The “woke crowd” do not have to influence those who treat others with respect anyway. I give credit to the many people I have worked with for their professionalism, the things that I was able to take from their teaching styles and how they were able to keep the school atmosphere positive. The ones that think they can push their way on the situation thrive on reactions, sadly, newbies don’t count. Everything needs a counter balance to make it work-their counter balance is to attack and destroy. Maintaining “A” balance is the best thing.

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  11. I think the author rather confuses Marxism and Postmodernism. The latter is simply a radical liberal form of pluralism taken to the extreme. Its analyses of power relations are real enough but postmodernists just cannot see the wood for the trees. Marxism is a class analysis, which will remain relevant as long as capitalism exists, and as overseas teachers we deal with an awful lot of budding little capitalists and real ones in management. Marxism covers a broad spectrum, ranging from Stalin to Dubcek, Che to Berlinguer. Is Yugoslavia really better after the nationalist wars than it was under Tito? It would be interesting to hear from teachers working in any of the Former Yugoslav republics.

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    1. Perhaps the authors idea was not do much to define the two as opposed to identifying how some people who are attracted to those ideas (ideals) misunderstand or misuse to support their own world. As economic vehicles, both socialism ( or by violent takeover, communism) and capitalism have to deal with human greed. I just feel capitalism is set up better to manage it. Socialist countries might try to ensure certain things are in place, but there will always be the ones who have better conditions, therefore pushing those who don’t to do what they can to attain more, often getting caught and being punished.

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    2. If we really want to get into the weeds and discuss economic systems for a minute, I would argue that “unrestrained capitalism” obviously leads to serious problems. If you just let “the market” decide everything you end up with little kids working in coal mines, monopolies that grow so big they eliminate competition-which is the supposed cornerstone of capitalism, and robber-barons who accumulate such disproportionate wealth they can essentially overthrow democracy.

      Clearly we need SOME restrictions on capitalism. Even a casual glance at the history of the 1800s should tell us that. The only questions are what type of restrictions? And how many?

      Marx correctly diagnosed the problem of unrestrained capitolism and offered some restrictions and modifications to theoretically solve those problems. When his theories were finally tried out, they proved not to work that well, but just means we need to keep experimenting to find DIFFERENT restrictions to place on capitalism to live in the optimized society, with the most shared prosperity and the least suffering. This is a process of trial and error. The perfect system has yet to be discovered.

      I think that so-called “Democratic Socialists” seem to have the best balance. They have democratically elected governments, mostly capitalist economies, but a large number of “socialized” industries run on a not-for-profit basis-the assumption being that prisons, hospitals, schools and the like should not be focusing on earning the maximum profit, regardless of the impact on people.

      It seems to me finding the right balance is the key to success. And neither the United States brand of capitalism nor the communism of modern countries has it quite right.

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    3. I would argue that the direct experience of teachers in overseas schools illustrates the realities of economic exploitation caused by greed, but it is certainly not the greed of teachers themselves. The strange ideological contortions of postmodernist identity politics seem to be a strained attempt to justify and divert attention away from the realities of exploitation and abuse. Teachers can easily see through such mystification if ever an overseas school management tries to use such liberalism in its ‘mission statements’.

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  12. So refreshing to see another perspective in this tired, old blog that isn’t exclusively progressive and I’m shocked that the ISR owners posted this. Kudos to them for allowing this discussion and I hope it won’t devolve to petty name-calling. So lazy and convenient to call anyone you disagree with nowadays as “racist” or “sexist” or (insert your “ist” here).

    Based on my experiences working in international schools for a while, I highly suspect a significant minority of teachers feel the same way as the author of this piece, including myself at times. I happen to work in one of the most liberal international schools in the world; one where if you give even a HINT you have any belief that can be construed as slightly on the conservative side, you will be called out, shamed, excluded and you simply won’t last long. I feel particularly bad for those of religious faith (which I am not). I considered myself a left leaner for most of my formative years in education, but in the last 10 years, in my opinion, the liberals have become too extreme, violent, and quick to cancel or destroy anyone who doesn’t fit their narrow, rigid, and extreme world paradigm. I have many friends on both sides of the aisle and it’s only the ones that lean right who have to hide their beliefs due to repercussions at work and with personal relationships. None (and I mean not one) of my conservative friends are racist in any way, shape, or form, regardless of the left’s dogma to paint all those who are white as such. I simply wouldn’t tolerate hanging out with anyone whom I believed was a racist. I also get irritated when certain clowns try to paint anyone with a non-progressive idea as a “Trump supporter.” That is quite presumptuous and akin to saying that every liberal is “feeling the Bern.”

    Attributes like personal responsibility, self-reliance, perseverance, balance, and respectful discourse have been usurped by a generation that is indoctrinated by the likes of CNN, MSNBC, TMZ, the Kardashians, and other reality and professional athletes. I’ll be thrilled to leave this profession soon as I can’t be part of this new so-called “woke” political machine and the practice of identity politics, one that is doing more harm than good in the world. 

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    1. Agree with you, except one thing. I am not thrilled to leave the profession! Now too old to get a work permit just about anywhere, I miss teaching and administration. To be on the scrapheap when you were born to teach is not a pleasure. But that’s for another thread!

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    2. I agree with you, 99%. Just don’t like hearing you will enjoy leaving the profession to get away from the people who irritate you.

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    3. I agree here. More discussion is needed everywhere about all this. In person, on forums, everywhere.

      For now it’s a smaller minority of very loud people who shout out this extreme ideology but if left unconfronted and unchecked, it has teeth for sure.

      Reading some of these comments is so cringy though…

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  13. When terms such as “Marxism” “postmodernism” and “totalitarian left” are used to qualify what are essentially feelings of discomfort (for having to bite your tongue, regulate your free speech) and fear (of getting fired), I zone out.
    Your feelings of confusion and insecurity are valid and you don’t need to bring along ideology and politics to back it up, your feelings are enough. You used to have to ‘watch out’ for those 1-2 older powerful male colleagues, and now, you’re having to, what feels like ‘bend over backwards’ for younger colleagues and, shock, even children. It’s a big change, and it sounds quite scary.
    As for our young learners: trigger warnings work like L.Os or a syllabus outline; they prepare learners for the content that is to come with an emphasis on emotions. Safe spaces don’t mean people outright refuse to touch certain topics, it means having spaces&resources available where those who know they have difficulty regulating their emotional reactions to certain topics, can go and prepare themselves quietly before coming back to connect with the material. There’s so much emphasis on well-being and resilience today, it’s actually the contrary; it’s about recognising your vulnerabilities, and building up the resources within yourself & your surroundings to develop your self-efficacy and being better equipped to face adversity.
    We’ve always changed books, syllabi, how is it any different to want to include more global perspectives, particularly in an international school setting? If this feels political/pandering to parents&students’ wants; you need to evaluate the power of your stakeholders and your leadership team’s direction and whether this is the school for you. This is a market. And people pay good money, so the school gives a little bit more to each student than a state school.
    Perhaps some seem to think the younger generation want to run through life with naive blinkers on avoiding those ‘good old harsh realities’ that exist. Apparently, if you dare want to challenge, question or change things, you’ll be branded with the usual barrage of insults: SJW, woke, cancel-culture, snowflake, activist.

    Being challenged and being silenced can feel very similar, but they are quite different.

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    1. The issue here is that this does actually have teeth though. Being offensive shouldn’t be illegal and a degeneration into believing that it should is lunacy.

      This is a very uniquely North American squalor we’re all having to witness these days, I would bet that the more woke comments posted to this article here were probably Americans or maybe Canadians.

      Can’t tell you how many Irish, Swedish and other European friends constantly send me eye roll emojis at our never ending nonsense in the States. These countries have better welfare systems than we’ll ever have, yet they don’t really give a __________ about what others post on Twitter or who said what.

      They’ve got more than two Political parties so I guess they’re used to hearing a variety of perspectives and don’t freak out when they hear something offensive.

      Bottom line is our culture is degenerating before our eyes. While we deal with this nonsense China’s gonna take lead and then… Well… Yeah we’ll see how that works out🤷‍♂️🤦‍♂️. People should just worry about themselves and living their lives. Take care od your own stuff and close your mouths more often 🙏

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    2. You may have hit some points there. Many European Parliaments have to deal with multiple parties and coalitions to get things through. Canada sometimes works like that, on a smaller way. I have always appreciated working with colleagues from other Countries, and it is very different in North America. Then, most of the woke probably never stepped out of their area or if they did, do not take notice of anything else besides their own agenda. Liberals have a hard time policing their left counterparts , I think because they do feel empathy for them, and the far right are too extreme as well. However, the woke bunch give the far right all the motivation they need. In a sense, the woke are literally waking up people who can’t stand them

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    3. So very true…”Being challenged and being silenced can feel very similar, but they are quite different.” I would encourage educators to read the book this thread is referencing (The Coddling of the American Mind), it speaks to many things educators have been witnessing for a long time and not just in higher education. Anxiety is a huge issue in children, which researchers say can be traced back to childhood free-play – or lack there of, for starters. I will say that there has been an over emphasis on feelings (trigger warnings, cancelling etc..) to the point where I question the resiliency and adult stability of the iGen/Gen Z population and those to come. We can’t go banning every book withr words we don’t like. Incidentally, when will the term headmaster be removed? I think international education hasn’t caught up to many things- heck CV’s have only just removed photos, but really what is the point- employers still ask for them along with weight being on a job application! Hardly “woke.” 😉

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  14. If you’re reading this be honest with yourself – can you change anyone’s opinion on this topic by TALKING? You can only change by listening and developing relationships. Stop being angry, it makes YOUR day worse.

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  15. The author appears to expressing their unhappiness at people and their boundaries. It is a typical political piece that aims to make the oppressed appear as the oppressors, (yes, you can still operate in privileged systems and experience oppression – there are many layers of privilege, its not just one big thing to point a stick at) and it fails in its aim to do so, more due to lack of ability than motivation. The entire text is written (ironically) in such as way as to suggest smouldering outrage at how other people define themselves, and what they say of themselves. There is a pervasive ‘moral entitlement’ that spurs the author to ever more unfounded and un-evidenced ‘feelings as facts’. This sentiment is supported by an unconvincing attack on ‘the totalitarian left’ (whatever that is), ‘the privileged left’ (whoever that is), and intellectualism in general, but this is secondary, and of little substance. A lot is written about in this area by professionals who do it for a living, so I suggest in future that the author read more scholarly texts in this area rather than grey literature, and focus on one key point and try and do that justice, otherwise all the other ideas and thoughts appear half-hearted and undeveloped. Also, the text is liberally suffused with punctuation errors and spelling mistakes, which the steady use of a thesaurus does not remedy.
    Finally, in my opinion, there is nothing wrong with privileged people, using their advantage to help others, and do good in the world, I think it is what they should be doing. It is cynical to imagine that just because you come of privilege, you are somehow de-humanised and without empathy. (This is after all the job of so many elite schools, to facilitate a sense of collaboration, cooperation, and family). The problem is that systems of privilege tend to work for those they serve (the privileged) and until such time as the advantaged make it clear that they mean to help (and actually do that), all we get is hypocrisy, and lip-service to humanitarianism.
    I have no issue with other people asking me to treat them in a way they prefer, people asking me to use a particular term of reference, or view them in a certain way. Times change (they always have done), and respecting others before belittling their identity is central to being an educator. Misrecognising wokeness as ‘oppression’ is not unusual for those with low self-confidence or people entwined in political narratives, but ultimately, it is the oppressed who ask for respect. The privileged don’t have to, they either have it, or they just don’t care.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. “The entire text is written (ironically) in such as way as to suggest smouldering outrage at how other people define themselves, and what they say of themselves.”

      No. Incorrect.

      I have no issue with how other people define or say about themselves.

      I have profound issues with the woke ideology’s pathological insistence that they have the right to define and control the identity and behavior of other people.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Liberals truly make me sick. I wish we had the freedom to speak freely on campus but the cost is too high. They are the bigots. Look at the definition. Thank heavens I work in a department where most people don’t involve themselves in such nonsense and are concerned with real actual problems.

    Have these people no shame? The blind leading the blind and we all fall in line for fear of losing our jobs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Agreed. Liberals and their pro-corporate polices have decimated Australia. Liberals are the worst as they transfer money to their corporate overlords! Wait…..we’re not allowed to use Liberal in ay way other than the American way?

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  17. Hilarious to see how triggered the liberals are from just reading this. As a Republican/conservative, I have to hide my politics. We have to hide your beliefs because of the assumptions. Only liberals and Biden followers are accepted. God forbid someone doesn’t follow the group. It’s sad when even curriculum experts like a famous TC “expert” spouts off her liberal agenda. Keep it out of schools.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Being Conservative shouldn’t ever be an issue. As a Moderate Liberal (Born in Mass, we’re blue up there) Idgaf if someone’s conservative or liberal. What matters is that there’s a reasonable dialogue taking place. I think Liberals need to be better at keeping this woke stuff out of that legitimate dialogue and on the fringe where it belongs. Same with Conservatives and the alt right. That’s how America it setup to work.

      That being said a two party system is setup to be tribal, diversity wins always.

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  18. Thank you OP. Actual free and evidence-based speech is dangerously threatened in education as of late. Groupthink is at an all-time high, and people are more than scared to give any type of logical ideas or arguments, even those that would actually help minorities and underrepresented peoples far more than the current orthodoxy in the media ever will.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Translation:

    I am a straight, white, male in my 50s. I do not want to impact change or read up to date research, and if I do have a quick google to help me respond to any of your irrelevant comments, I will categorically dismiss any articles on inequality and inequity written by non cisgender straight males or people of colour.

    I certainly do not want to change how I shape young minds to keep up with a world that doesn’t respect me the way it used to! I want to talk about Marxism, I want to keep my post-colonial privilege – and no I won’t ‘check my privilege’! Of course I’m privileged in my JOB, I capitalise on the fact that I’m a ‘Western’ teacher in a foreign country, but let me be clear that it has NOTHING to do with the colour of my skin!

    “Why do you have to make everything about race?” I often say to my young, brown, female colleague when she fearfully but politely checks my political correctness (and threatens my masculinity). I say, the students have too much power and we need to remind them of their place in the education system as passive learners. They are spending far too much time contemplating their identities and their place in a world that is rapidly changing, I don’t want to have to learn about their experiences and struggles in order to address this! And don’t get me started on this ‘systemic racism’ that they speak of! What a load of rubbish.

    I definitely don’t want to hear about Black Lives Matter or LGBTQ++ (I annoy myself just including this acronym, why can’t we just say **** like we did in the good old days?)

    How dare you oppress me and my white, male-centric opinions about things I cannot understand and that do not relate to me! It is my right to maintain my privilege at any cost! Let me man-splain this to you… The youths of today, both the students I teach AND my younger colleagues, keep challenging my outdated and problematic world view and it’s just typical radical behaviour. All these kids making drama when they could just keep their heads down and let the white men do the talking!

    I will continue to intellectualise this subject at the emotional cost of those around me. I will refuse to use more inclusive language and will continue to exclude and reject the voices of the marginalised and just label them ‘younger generation of students’. Let me remind you, when I got my degree, in the 80s, higher education was only for people like me! Ah the good ol’ days when there was only one point of view, the white – I mean, the right one.

    Finally and most important of all, I don’t want ‘wokeness’ to infiltrate my own belief system or the beliefs of those around me because I don’t want to be reminded that for me, in my position of power and status as a white straight male, equality somehow feels like oppression. I can’t really explain it without acknowledging that if women, people of colour and the LGBTQ++ community raise their voices, my deep-seated fear of being treated the way that I have always treated them will be realised.

    I am grateful to be an international school teacher. But let me be clear, I do not care about how I could be a better ally, teacher or human. I am a product of the systemically racist society I was raised in and I will do absolutely nothing to dismantle it.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. While I welcomed the article due to the exponential nature of wokeness that sometimes befuddles me even as a TOC (teacher of color…we have Facebook groups to prove that that’s a real acronym!), I have to give credit to this person’s satirical response to the article. Very well done. I just wish we could all meet in the middle or something.

      Like for example, I had a student who recently has asked me to refer to them with different pronouns, with a different name, and to not mention it to their parents. I was 100% on board. I even made sure to tell a substitute teacher recently about this (after talking to the student), so they were aware of where the student is at. But I also think it’s silly that people are getting canceled for misgendering trans folks or being of the opinion that there are only two genders (not my opinion, but I don’t have a problem with someone having that opinion).

      Where do we meet in the middle? Can we? Is it a zero sum situation? Is there any tolerance for how people view the world differently?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Keep it to yourself. This response is a prejudice retort based on the OP’s predicted skin color and age. You are literally self fulfilling this prophecy of everything being about race.

      Just drop it and have a dialogue with someone you might disagree with, that works out better in the end.

      Liked by 1 person

    3. Ah, you were the person who perfectly regurgitated the lectures of your “professors” in your “gender studies”, “intersectionality”” and “social justice” classes. And you still haven’t forgotten a single word. Congratulations. Education was probably your only job/career option? Although, I would have definitely hired you as chief editor for PRAVDA.

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  20. The most offensive thing about the post is how poorly written it is. I expect more from my DP students in terms of argumentation, style and grammar.
    As for content, it would be hilarious (oh, poor me, I’m so oppressed, my rights are being trodden upon, the young teachers are mean to me) except for the obvious problem that the writer isn’t trying to be funny.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. It is good that more people are having this conversation. The next step forward will be for us all to recognise that the OP (and most of those putting forward similar arguments) has not and is not advocating harming people, not being respectful, questioning anyone’s right to be, or any of the other misreadings thrown his way in these comments. Nor is there any reason to suggest the OP is feeling threatened.

    Also, causing offence is not causing harm. If you are harmed after reading the OP, that harm is caused by your contingent, belief mediated convictions, not by the words themselves. It might be in your interests to seek out less fragile beliefs rather than blaming others for your own self-inflicted distress.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Get woke go Broke…..first off anyone can say they’re “black” on this forum as nobody can actually verify that so I’m NOT impressed, even if it is true. It is your democratic right to vote for who you want so no argument there, but no plaudits either as your candidate of choice represented everyehting that is actually wrong with the supremacist,mysognist sub-culture of America. Your figures don’t match reality as 9 people died in BLM protests or those associated with them. Your claims are based on false or exaggerated figures that have been disproved repeatedly….which makes me wonder if anything you sp[out here can be trusted. You are desperately trying to bamboozle and BS people on this site making unproven claims and quoting illusory “statistics” , which is a trademark of MAGA hat wearers and Trumpkin minions worldwide. I would suggest that you stop drinking the Trump Koolaide and rejoin humanity in the real world as your mentor is gone for good and your saviour is getting closer to another bankrupcy and hopefully a long jail term.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This was an interesting read. While I disagree with some of the ideas contained within, the true gold lies in the comments below. Several posters are revealing that they hide their conservative beliefs out of fear of retribution from the mob. One commenter went as far as to disbelieve someone’s racial identity and suggest that they rediscover their humanity. Others are right vs left. Are we all subconsciously passing this bile and conflict onto children? That is the true question that I was left with.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I wouldn’t be surprised if YOU wrote this article. I’ve been reading your comments for years and this sounds like you. And to start your comment by announcing you won’t believe anyone’s declared race if they say they’re black is just *chef’s kiss* So you DO believe people who declare themselves white, right? And wait, what was that point about not making someone’s race the first thing to focus on? 😂😂😂

      Liked by 1 person

  23. I today’s world, it appears most international schools refer in some way to developing global citizens. Sometimes referred to as international-mindedness (an IB term) or global competency (UN term). If this is the case at your (generally referring to all readers of this comment) international school then it behooves us all to keep in mind that we must recognize our own perspectives and the perspectives of others. This aspect of global competency doesn’t say we have to agree, only that we recognize there are other opinions. When dealing with younger teachers who express some of what the author writes about, pointing out there are other perspectives and these perspectives are not all American as the author presumes is a starting point. At the same time, the author must also recognize that his or her opinions are not the only ones valid and that the younger teachers also have a valid perspective and opinions. There are other aspects to global competency, but would require me to write a whole column myself.

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  24. Oh dear, well, where do we start? I’m far from being a ‘young’ teacher, and have some sympathy with the idea that sometimes you have to confront and deal with ideas which are opposed to your own without shutting down and not listening (a flaw brought on by social media, IMO.)

    Firstly, the essay is pretty ’empty’ of ideas. It’s pretty much a long rant against the world whilst at the same time being unable or unwilling to talk specifics. Much like Trump, Farage or Johnson would make. I have about as little sympathy with the far left as I do with the far right (such as those three).

    The author makes little in the way of suggestions as to how to resolve this. What would he do in, say, a school in China, where the first black student joins and is subject to racist comments and mutterings from the start – would he try to protect the student, or just say ‘it’s China, it’s just the way it is here’? Or for the student in Egypt coming to terms with being gay in a society which refuses to even countenance the possibility? Both of which I’ve encountered in my teaching career, by the way.

    The author probably considers himself to be a liberal, and a classical liberal at that. The view of freedom of speech trumps all. It’s a pity, then, that he ignores the teaching of the great liberal thinker John Stuart Mill, who recognised that freedoms had a limit where they then cause harm to others.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If you think Boris Johnson is far right, then you have shown where you stand. Farage is not far right either.

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  25. The story you have been told and continues to be told about your own heritage (western and white) is a lie. Lies need to be corrected. If the words / views you are using and expressing are racist expect them to be challenged. If you don’t like it and want to feel safe, go back to what ever little red neck backwater you came from and call home!

    Liked by 3 people

  26. omgarsenal mentions “Trumpism” as though everyone here is (must!) be American and interpret the world via an American lens. No other viewpoints are to be allowed on an INTERNATIONAL school website except for an American view. omgarsenal welcomes a new age of complete American cultural hegemony. I find this chilling.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wrong again anonymouse…too afraid to write under your real ID but that’s fine. Trumpism has NO nationality as is shown here on ISR. People who are not Yanks, like me, can hold Trumpist views and far right opinions and that’s also fine. You on the other hand are using the Trumpist style hyperbole and misinformation out of ignorance and shameful cowardice since what you say goes against what ISR stands for.

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  27. Neanderthal seems to be forgetting that’s exactly how all females and non-whites were treated around most of the world (and still continue to be in many developing countries, like the US) in the 1950’s and 1960’s.

    Why are those white males with power and money so threatened? Hmmmm…ironically, it’s the poor and lower-middle class non-college degree whites in the South and Rust Belt who comprise the majority of Trump voters in those states. I really think most of them would rather give up their healthcare (to the point of dying) instead of having it administered by Barack Obama or Kamala Harris.

    Of course, the Federal government is out to take away all handguns and hunting rifles too, that type of appeal to the qAnon crowd will raise hundreds of millions and continue the current cycle of mass shooting, recriminations, rinse and repeat.

    It’s a strange thing. Many Americans still believe in the American dream, that they can be successful if they only work hard enough, and anyone who’s not rich (the middle class are the ones actually paying their taxes) deserves to be in their position due to laziness or “lack of will to succeed.” They don’t realize social mobility from class to class is basically about the same in the US, China and Russia these days.

    But as long as it’s not a female, not a gay person, not a minority, not an immigrant, not someone who believes in any religion or system (atheism/agnosticism) other than Christianity, they don’t deserve to exist. They don’t realize that fake Christians were mocking them the entire time just to get their votes on the abortion issue.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Anyone working in the international school circuit who doesn’t think white privilege is real is deluding themselves. This isn’t about being woke or liberal. There is a set image around the world of what an international teacher/leader should look like. Unfortunately this stereotype extends to minority communities too. As a brown person, I have to work extra hard and go through MANY rejections to secure a single international posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I have always done my best to not share my personal views at work. I also do not socialise with colleagues as I have seen too many bad situations develop that way with other people. I am friendly to all and do my best to work hard and support students and colleagues in the work environment with tasks related to learning, school mission, etc. Work is work and personal life is separate, This is how I have been successful in some very toxic school environments, To each his own.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Keeping your personal opinions to yourself is considered ‘violence’ according to Anti-racist dogma. What will you do when you are called out for not raising a fist in lockstep with your peers?

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  30. First, anti-wokeness and even that term “wokeness” is ideology of the conservative. Therefore, one of the respondents was not wrong in recognizing and stating so. Let’s not gaslight. I find the entire article highly problematic, especially from someone teaching and influencing in an international school. To be offended by ideals which promote equity, inclusion and diversity is to double down on ideals and practices which cause harm and protect the status quo. This isn’t about censorship. This is about harm caused by toxic views which have promoted ideologies of racial, cultural and gender hierarchies. For the OP to not understand that is not just scary, but suggests an air of willful ignorance. Developing a global consciousness and just being a decent human means that you are constantly evolving and challenging yourself and your ideals and in the international school context this is a must. So, no, it’s not that you cannot have ideals that are different, it’s that you SHOULD not be occupying spaces where you can cause harm. If that means that you should not be in international school spaces, then so be it. In fact, I would think the OP and those who agree shouldn’t be influencing anyone’s children but their own.

    Moreover, I’m surprised that one who is so convicted and steadfast and seemingly feels “right” in their conviction would submit this anonymously. A bit cowardice in my opinion. The people who work with you and the school community should be made aware of your views and your potential for causing harm. It is a community safeguarding issue.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh.. I don’t know. I think it extends way beyond being diverse and inclusive. I think we can agree on how it’s generally progress in the good sense that we are more careful with the words we choose/use and broaden our perspectives that were formed in non diverse isolated sanctums. (I happen not to suffer from this white American trait, as I am an immigrant who has also spent beyond a decade living and working overseas, and happen to be trilingual. Let’s get into the grit here. . The devil is in the details. Are you racing to “decolonize” STEM? are you trying to rewrite “white man’s math? (which actually initially was the work of Indians and Muslims). Needless to say the parents of children around the world don’t believe any such nonsense and aren’t XKendian in the slightest. Are any “disparate outcomes” automatically “racist”? or proof of “systemtic racism”” , etc. Though I agree with some of the more thoughtful criticisms of the short article, what is way more joyful is the “triggering”” of the “woke”” (correction, that term is also used by Black Americans who happen to be heterodox thinkers and what is particularly amusing overall is the the privileged white masses tend to be far more “woke” than the people of whom they profess to be “allies” (with notable exception of the Black “commentariat”) People should begin to read Professor John McWhorter’s “The Elect”” (a Black Ivy league professor who is brave enough to take a stand )

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    2. Oh.. I don’t know. I think it extends way beyond being diverse and inclusive. I think we can agree on how it’s generally progress in the good sense that we are more careful with the words we choose/use and broaden our perspectives that were formed in non diverse isolated sanctums. (I happen not to suffer from this white American trait, as I am an immigrant who has also spent beyond a decade living and working overseas, and happen to be trilingual. Let’s get into the grit here. . The devil is in the details. Are you racing to “decolonize” STEM? are you trying to rewrite “white man’s math? (which actually initially was the work of Indians and Muslims). Needless to say the parents of children around the world don’t believe any such nonsense and aren’t XKendian in the slightest. Are any “disparate outcomes” automatically “racist”? or proof of “systemtic racism”” , etc. Though I agree with some of the more thoughtful criticisms of the short article, what is way more joyful is the “triggering”” of the “woke”” (correction, that term is also used by Black Americans who happen to be heterodox thinkers and what is particularly amusing overall is the the privileged white masses tend to be far more “woke” than the people of whom they profess to be “allies” (with notable exception of the Black “commentariat”) People should begin to read Professor John McWhorter’s “The Elect”” (a Black Ivy league professor who is brave enough to take a stand )

      Btw. you sound like the person who would insist on using the word “latinx”” in order to promote “inclusivity” even though it’s a white addition to a word created by whites.. Latino. because Americans are too lazy/stupid to think every brown Spanish speaking person isn’t a Mexican and was a useful identity politics trick). Anyways, poll consistently show that around 95% or more of “Latinos” and “Latinas”” reject the latinx word). I think I am going to be “respectful to the local culture(s) and ensure that I never use it around them. 🙂

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  31. Good points. I really enjoy upsetting PC people. It makes my day. I will express my own opinions and speak my own mind and I really do not give a rats ass who I offend. Its called free speech and freedom to express your own opinions. Correct me and I will correct you! Ironically most people I taught with in 5 countries over 27 years respected that.

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  32. I’m wondering how many of you posting in response to the OP teach in IB schools. The IBO Mission Statement and Learner Profile Attributes spotlight open-mindedness, caring, intercultural understanding (which includes the cultures of liberal and conservative) and recognizing the views of others can “also be right.” Freedom of speech and expression are encouraged as long as you are respectful of others. Why does it have to be all or nothing?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have been at 2 highly toxic “IB” schools where the only opinions allowed were those congruent with school management and the facade they wanted to cultivate to attract new students. IB is no longer a quality distinction and too many schools are just going through the motions to be viable in their highly competitive markets. Sad to say but has been my experience.

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  33. https://eand.co/americans-shouldnt-fear-cultural-change-they-should-embrace-it-b77dc437760b

    Cancel Culture” Isn’t the Problem — American Culture Is
    “Cancel Culture” is Just People Telling Their Own Stories in Their Own Words. That’s a Good Thing

    But none of that is remotely true. In fact, it’s completely ridiculous. Asking someone to call you what you want to be called isn’t putting anyone in a gulag. “Cancelling” someone, which means making face some kind of cultural or maybe economic consequences for racism or bigotry or so on — even that’s not remotely putting someone in a gulag.

    Furthermore, as we’ve already proven, if you’re really on the side of freedom of speech, you’ll happily call people what they want to be called, not what you want to call them — because that’s what “freedom of speech” really is.

    Let me put that point more sharply. Was it “freedom of speech” when minorities were called [insert your choice of racist slur here] for generations…decades…centuries? Of course it wasn’t. It was the absence of freedom of speech. It was people not having dignity and worth and respect, which is precisely why respect is so important to so many minorities. It was their freedom of speech being taken away.
    Let me put that more formally. When we think of freedom of speech, we think of it in atomised terms, individualistic ones, especially if we’re Americans. But speech involves two people, at least, and usually many more. So in any context, we have to ask: is the sum total of all this speech really being expanded? Does it grow, increase, prosper?

    When all those hateful racists were calling minorities slurs, as they did in America for generations, freedom of speech was minimized. The slur replaced so many, many words that could and should have been used, which were not just far more accurate, but more nuanced, respectful, and so on. Black People were called one or just a few racist slurs, instead of the many vibrant phrases we can now use to describe African Americans — hey, is that person ethnically Kenyan? Or maybe from Ghana, way back so long ago? Asians were called another set of racist slurs — instead of the far more accurate and respectful idea of Korean-Americans and Chinese-Americans and even, well “Asians.” Maybe you see my point.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I think there’s some throwing the baby out with the bathwater in this article. I think we can all agree that respect for others is a good thing. I hope we can all agree that learning about people whose lives are different from our own is also a good thing.

    So there are ways to go about building that which are better than others. Ostracizing people who disagree, only allowing one point of view, and judging other people’s value are all problematic ways to achieve greater respect and inclusion. But including diverse representations in our libraries, educating students about our history, and cultivating respect in our students can be much better ways of achieving that goal.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. It appears that as usual the conservative thinks freedom of speech includes freedom to infringe on other peoples’ right to be. When people stand up to the conservative, racist, prejudiced person the conservative quickly cries they are being censored. Sad thing is they just don’t get it and never will. The only defense is to stand up and be counted, legislate, protest and squelch those that think their rights extend to abusing others.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Got to love the intolerant left. The writer never claimed to be conservative, they never mentioned anyone’s race. You implied all of those things. They never suggested that anyone did not have a right to be heard. YOU are the only person who is calling to squelch those who oppose your world view. All you did was prove the OP’s point.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. “Squelch”???
      I guess we should say thank you for proving the author correct.

      Yes, Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mau, Pol Pot, and many petty dictators all agree that it is perfectly correct to “squelch” anyone who disagrees.
      But as you did, it is best to ‘name-call’ and label those you disagree with before your act of squelching.
      ~Bravo!

      And I would add that the author advocates for a free exchange of ideas.
      ‘Lighten up dude…’

      Liked by 2 people

    3. Conservatives are the only ones who value freedom of speech, and the word “conservative” should not be so cavalierly tossed around on an international teaching site because there is not going to be a universal understanding of this term. The same is true of “Liberal” – an Australian would have a very different understanding of this term than would an American.

      Using the American version of Liberal, you are so very very wrong. In fact, in history it was the conservatives who demanded obedience and it was the Liberals who infringed on unchecked power. Much of the world (outside the very safe and coddled Western world) sees authoritarians oppressing freedoms including freedom of speech.

      Voltaire – “Anyone who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.” That the clueless privileged the world should beseech US cultural imperialism is hubris.

      Maybe these pharisees should do more about the crushing poverty existing outside the campus gates rather than virtue signal. But then, that would take real effort and the “everybody gets a trophy” generation really doesn’t know about real work.

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  36. The entire meme of political correctness and being “woke” is just an alternate, modernist way of saying that courtesy,tolerance,respect,consideration and equity are important qualities for people to exercise. This evolves from having a conscientious and supportive upbringing by a family that educates their members to exercise the anove attitudes. It also requires that our educational system promotes such values. Basically the above memes can be summarized in a few words; being humane and thoughtful of others feelings and showing good judgement and common sense when dealing with others-treat others as you would expect to be treated.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That would be nice, but there is a puritanical, holier-than-thou dimension to identity politics and the rest of the phenomena which the OP described. He is right.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. And in light of everything that happened recently, many teachers at independent schools are taking DEI (Diversity, equity, and inclusion) workshops. I suggest anyone who wished to teach again in the US be aware that schools look for teachers who have a proven track record of teaching tolerance.

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  37. For a site that prides itself on freedom of speech, the mods sure so enjoy censoring the sharing of ideas. If you are not a member of the woke crowd you have no place here, except of course if you want to berate schools in reviews.
    The coddling of the American mind should be required reading in all teacher training programs, but at this rate I’m sure it will be banned along with Dr. Seuss and Aunt Jamima.
    The intolerant left are the true racists these days. Look no further than Senatory Duckworth and Hirono who just this week said they would not vote to confirm anyone who was white for Biden cabinet posts. Are book burning festivals and segregated drinking fountains next? Stop the madness before it’s too late.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Go woke go broke your obvious Trumpism is showing. Who said anything here about the right or the left. You DO love to judge and pidgeon-hole others who you believe represent evil incarnate, ie: the progressives. What madness are you going to stop? Mob insurrectionm that invades the Capitol building. led by ” Proud Boy” white supremacists? White men attacking and murdering Asian American women, especially the elderly? Rogue cops using blacks and people of colour for target practice? White women calling cops on anyone of colour or black who DARES lead ordinary lives in public (dog walking, BBQing, etc.)?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. @omgarsenal, first of all I am a black man and I did vote for Trump. Yes, the storming of the U.S. capital was awful and is not a reflection on anything good. It was a mob and was stopped. Are you also willing to recognize that BLM riots caused over 30 deaths and an estimated $2 Billion in damages? Are you suggesting that cops are hunting people of color? According to the DOJ, police make about 10 million arrests each year. As a rough average, 7 million of the arrested suspects are white and 3 million are black. Out of that number, last year, 25 unarmed white people were killed by police, compared to 14 unarmed black people, according to the Washington Post database of police shootings. That means about .0004 percent of all blacks arrested were killed while unarmed. The percentage for whites is comparable. In total, 1,000 people were shot and killed by police in 2019, the vast majority of whom were armed. Still, that’s a mere .01 percent of all arrests.
      Are you aware that back in February a black man attacked an Asian woman in San Francisco and activists called it “white supremacy”? Are you willing to entertain that black on black violence is the leading cause of shootings in Chicago and Oakland? Stop being woke and wake up!

      Liked by 2 people

    3. Except of course Dr. Seuss has not been banned. And the decision to no longer use Aunt Jemima was a corporate one. Why do you oppose free markets? I thought that in free markets producers responded to consumers? Do you disagree? Are are you just being emotional because your demands are no longer being met by a changing world? In a free market you can promote racist stereotypes if you want, but the market is free to object.

      Liked by 1 person

    4. except that it’s not a “free marketplace”. You obviously haven’t looked at any polling data whatsoever. It is a very small and very loud screaming minority that has installed themselves as the “gatekeepers” because prior power centers have essentially capitulated to the small screaming mobs. (e.g. Latinx – free marketplace?? of whom?)

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Sorry OP, but you picked the wrong arena for this fight if you seek a free marketplace of ideas. Last week the mods took down my post, apparently because it contained the word “Is*mo*hobe” (I have to self-censor just to get this one posted!) This is not an even playing field.

    Liked by 2 people

  39. I work in China and luckily we don’t have that problem here. I can be very non PC and nobody cares, except to joke that we couldn’t do that back in the west!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mike, from what I hear about working in China, political and religion are not welcome discussions, nor is any criticism of the government tolerated, especially from foreigners, but everything else is ok? I think their form of control and censorship is the real political correctness in a very dramatic sense.

      Like

    2. Try criticizing Ji or protesting what is happening in Xinjiang and get back to us. It’s just a different PC and it’s a shame you don’t get it. 10 year China teacher.

      Like

    3. I didn’t come here to China to protest or get involved in politics. I came here to work and enjoy my life. I have been here 11 years and now married to a Chinese woman for over 5 years and our American/Chinese son will be 3 years old soon. So yes, I “get it” and I choose not to be bothered by it.

      Liked by 3 people

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