School Mission Statements: Fact, Fantasy or Promo?

A look behind the façade of well-crafted, lofty verbiage reveals most school Mission Statements are composed of unquantifiable promises, often nothing more than well worded promos intended to lure paying customers.

In 2011, ISR visited the topic of International Schools’ Mission Statements and asked teachers to comment on their school’s statement. Did the school live up to their Mission Statement? Here’s some excerpts from that Article:

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 “Eventually we came up with something that made us sound great. Only problem was…we were none of those things. It was a great piece of advertising and it helped the school sell itself to unsuspecting parents.

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I challenge anyone to find a school where the majority of staff can come to consensus on just what is a “global citizen.”

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“It should’ve just said: The school’s aim is make as much money as possible, to promise the world yet never deliver, to exploit staff, to provide students with crappy facilities and to forever function well below its potential”

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ln our experience, there’s a direct correlation between schools with reach for the moon Mission Statements and varying degrees of chaos. From parents and students calling all the shots and regular grade fixing, to an admin who could care less if goals are met, typical pie-in-the-sky Mission Statements offer no direction, organization nor measurable goals and lead to schools adrift like a ship without a rudder.

Fortunately, not all Mission Statements fit into the above category. Here’s a solid Mission Statement with quantifiable, measurable goals as shared by an ISR member.

ABC Academy challenges its students to academic excellence through the medium of a college preparatory curriculum and U.S. academic standards, with instruction in English language. ABC Academy values community service and responsible global citizenship and promotes the integral development of each student within a multicultural setting.

ISR asks: What’s changed since our first look at International School Mission Statements almost 10 years ago? With schools popping up across the globe, is competition encouraging a focus on measurable goals and a record of meeting those goals? Or have over-the-top, unmeasurable and unobtainable promises, solely designed to steer clients away from the competition, becoming the norm? What’s the situation at YOUR school?

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What’s Your Take on International School Accreditation?

..ISR wants to hear YOUR thoughts on the topic of International School accreditation.  If you’ve been through the accreditation process or worked at an accredited International School, chances are good you have something to Share.

According to a major accreditation agency (who shall remain unnamed), the following characteristics are essential for an International School seeking accreditation:

 “The award of accreditation shows that the school:

  •  is devoted to its mission & vision for students
  •  has thought deeply about the services it offers to students, family and community
  •  invests time and resources for validation from a globally-recognized accreditation authority
  •  focuses on the quality of teaching, student learning, & student safeguarding and well-being
  •  is committed to the development of the students’ global citizenship
  •  has a suitable philosophy of education suitable for its students
  •  promises only what it can deliver
  •  is open to regular evaluation by its own school community and peer evaluators
  •  constantly seeks improvement in all areas of the school plans strategically for the future”

ISR Asks:  Reflecting on the accreditation process in which you participated (or witnessed from the sidelines), how were the foregoing ideals fulfilled by your school? For example,

  • Who determined, and how did your school define, a “global citizen?
  • Did/does your school encourage regular evaluation? (think: International Schools Review)
  • Who selected those teachers personally interviewed by the accreditation team?
  • Do you think the accreditation team may have been swayed by elegant dinners, fancy hotels and off-topic excursions?
  • Why are the needs and well-being of teachers noticeably absent?
  • Is the accreditation process transparent?
  • How were the majority of ideals, as above, quantified during the accreditation process?

Your perspective on accreditation will naturally be different from the standpoint of a teacher as compared to that of an administrator, as well as between that of a department chair and a department member. Should you choose to Comment on this Article, we courage you to preface your Comments with a brief, one-sentence introduction telling us from what perspective you are writing. For example: I am writing as a teacher on the sidelines, principal/director, counselor, teacher who was interviewed, etc.

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