How Long Do Intern’l Educators Stay Overseas?

September 21, 2017


The majority of international educators go overseas with the idea that they’ll check out international education, spend a year or so in some exotic location and then return home. Not surprisingly, 2 years turns into 3, then 4 and before you know it, it’s 8 years and counting!

Take our Survey to see how many years International Educators stay overseas. Clicking the “View Results” link at the bottom of the Survey will display up-to-the-minute results.

Take our Short Survey

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Going International with Health Issues

October 29, 2015

Hospital building flat style. Ambulance and helicopter, health and care, aid and doctor. Vector illustration

Finding yourself overseas, cut off from meds and treatments you need is an emergency best avoided. So…If you live with a chronic health condition requiring periodic medical care and/or daily medication, do take the time to research medical procedures and medications available in what may soon become your new host country.

Diabetes, hyper-tension, high cholesterol and a host of other nagging yet common conditions are readily treated in most corners of the globe. If, however, you’re living with a less common condition that could be outside the expertise of the medical community at your destination, you’re advised to research whether the treatments you require will be available.

If it is specialty meds you require, bring a hefty supply with you overseas and do this even if the drug is available at your destination. It’s not uncommon for supplies to become exhausted in some locales and shipping networks can and do break down. Don’t count on having your prescription mailed to you, either. Customs duties can be ridiculously absorbent and the time your meds spend in customs may be long….too long!

On a similar note, a member writes: When I returned to the States from the African continent last Christmas, I soon discovered I had contracted a nasty tropical disease. Feeling worse by the minute and dealing with a wide range of ugly effects, I was not able to get it treated in my North American city of 650,000 inhabitants as it was, obviously, an uncommon disease in this part of the world. Fortunately I had brought meds back with me at the suggestion of our school nurse who advised all teachers to bring a supply ‘just in case.’ Lesson learned: Don’t take anything for granted! Lack of available care and/or medicine can happen anyplace in the world.

This brings us to the topic of health Insurance. Normally, schools purchase what is known as “group insurance.” This means that one or two members of the group with a costly pre-existing conditions can and do cause the overall price for the group to soar. Health issues can be a deterrent when schools consider teachers for employment. If you do have a pre-existing health issue, thoroughly read the school’s health insurance policy to be sure your condition is covered. Don’t take anything for granted, or the word of anyone telling you…”I think it’s covered.” ISR Reviews attest to teachers who found themselves overseas with a costly condition not covered by their school’s health Insurance policy. As always, we recommend research and the sharing of information and experiences. International Teachers Keeping Each Other Informed is what ISR is All About!

We invite you to post questions and comments concerning
medical issues as they relate to the International Teaching experience.


How Old is Too Old to Teach Overseas?

June 4, 2015

birthday cake with the lot of burning candles

In most Western cultures, there are scads of people in their 50’s and decades beyond who are strong and athletic, accepting new career challenges, following a “clean” diet and becoming, in some ways, younger than ever before. They’re enjoying a thoroughly active lifestyle. Are these seniors fit, mentally & physically, to teach? Yes!! If a teacher feels up to the task, they’re welcome to head up a classroom and their experienced worldly perspective is appreciated. However, in some parts of the world, the perception of age carries very different connotations and limitations.

If you’ve lived in the developing world you have  probably seen that “40 is the new 70.” Life isn’t easy in these places and people appear to be aged far beyond their chronological years. In many such countries the mandatory age for retirement is set low and we as international educators are subject to those same regulations.  I was turned down for a position due to my age. The interviewing-director looked twice my years but apparently the date on his passport said different. Fit or fat, vibrant or over-the-hill, it’s your birth date that matters when it comes to getting a work visa.

One would think developed nations might welcome, older, more experienced educators to their shores. Unfortunately, most fear that older educators will face health problems and quickly become a financial burden on their system. Then there is the increased cost to a school that hires an older person because they generally cause health insurance costs to soar. Although most international school Directors will state they like to hire older educators because of the experience they bring to their school, it is apparent that due to other factors it may not always be feasible.

If you are over 50 and having trouble landing an overseas teaching position, don’t despair! You can still live your dream. ISR offers two valuable resources to help members of the “graying” population find overseas teaching posts. We invite you to visit the ISR Work Visa vs. Age Chart and the very informative Blog, Overseas & Over 50 with nearly 600 Comments from aging International educators around the world.

Work Visa vs. Age
Overseas & Over 50


Nagging Health Problems and No Health Insurance

August 28, 2014

healthclaimform6642790Whether or not you’re dealing with a health issue, an attractive benefit of any International School Contract is health insurance–especially if it’s a comprehensive policy! My last insurance included worldwide coverage with just a $100 deductible. That’s a super perk considering that while back in the States one summer I had my shoulder repaired for only the cost of the deductible.

But what do you do when you have health issues or need emergency care and your new school’s health insurance policy has failed to materialize? We transplanted the following letter from the ISR Forum. It outlines a thought-provoking ‘personal health vs. insurance’ situation. We don’t have all the details but the poster does tells us his school knew of his health issues and his need for insurance prior to signing on.

“I began working at my school in July. In my contract it states that I will receive health insurance after I obtain my work visa. I foolishly assumed I would get a work visa soon after arriving.  This has not been the case. There are teachers who have been at the school more than a semester and who still have no health insurance. I also found out (or at least I’ve been told) that the school has already met the limit of employees who may receive work visas.

I have health issues and the prescriptions here run me more than $300 a month. I met with the school’s director about the issue and let him know that I could not afford to pay this amount for my prescriptions (salaries at the school are very low and living costs are high in this country). He confirmed that it might be quite some time before I receive medical coverage. He never got back to me. Yesterday I received a contract offer from a school whose salary and benefits are more in line with what I’m used to with international schools. I will have health insurance (and a paid apartment) immediately upon my arrival.

The school seems to genuinely want to help students of all means, although it can also be said that the school does not give equal concern to the teachers. I doubt that they could do anything to me legally, but I guess that I’m looking for affirmation that I have a right to just up and leave. If I end up in the hospital for any reason here in this country, I face financial ruin.

ISR wants to know what our readers’ take is on this situation. Would you have advised this poster to arrive with 3 months’ worth of prescriptions and a means to get more through whatever channels he/she was using prior to going overseas? Should the school have been more upfront about the insurance situation?  As insurance policies are a major benefit, should they definitely be in place if offered in a contract? Additionally, since insurance policies, unless restricted to just local use, are normally provided through Western insurance companies, is the idea that a work visa is needed to secure such a policy suspect? Should the school have changed its insurance procedures so all teachers would be immediately covered? At what point does a school become responsible for their teachers’ personal needs?


Career Changers – Follow Your Heart, But Not to the Bottom of the Salary Scale

October 20, 2011

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Posted by ISR Guest Blogger

In sour economies like the current one, teaching becomes a popular refuge for its high job stability and, especially among international schools, easy mobility. After a training program, laid-off workers can enter the profession in relatively short order, and certified teachers, who may have been working in other professions, can re-enter teaching when they see their prospects dry up elsewhere. The economy can even be the final spur that motivates people to change directions and act on a long-held desire to teach.

The trade-off is, of course, money. Would-be teachers considering a switch from a higher-paying profession balk, or at least should balk, at the idea of taking a $25,000 starting salary at a second-tier international school. Poor economy or not,  such numbers are insulting to any serious-minded professional. Recruiters will never fail to emphasize how much you can save given the cost of living in many countries. Still, some quick math, generally corroborated by reviewers on ISR, will show that the savings are rarely all that much when working at the bottom of the salary ladder.
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So what can career changers or those returning to the profession after a long absence do to sell themselves? First, let’s consider the advantages older candidates bring to international teaching. Those in their 30s and 40s (hopefully) bring a greater reliability to their duties. It’s less likely that these will be the faculty members coming into class bleary-eyed after an all-night binger. Second, older candidates have probably already withstood significant job stress which can make them less likely to become “runners” when things don’t go as planned abroad. Most importantly, older candidates can bring related professional skills with them that school heads would be wise to note. For example:
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Candidates with management experience often make great leaders at the department or administrative level. Those with athletic prowess can be inspiring coaches. Those coming from IT are likely to be far more agile in classroom technologies than the average instructor. Those who have experience in foreign languages, or with a specific foreign population,  should highlight how quickly they would adapt to X, Y or Z country or situation.
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How much related skills are worth in real terms is anyone’s guess, and many school heads have blinders on to everyone but the most experienced candidates, but whatever added value you can communicate in your profile might give you a step up on what would otherwise be a very tall ladder. Career-changers and others,  ISR invites you to share your thoughts on this topic.

Is International Teaching a Career or an Adventure

July 21, 2011
The recent blog topic of whether or not teaching overseas is a good career decision prompted me to reflect more on my own desires and motivations to continue teaching overseas. A few people posted on this thread that teaching overseas was “just a job, not a career,” at least not a long-term one.  Among other worries, some expressed concern about the lack of job security, a pension, or a plan for retirement.
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Like many other people who posted, I share a love for travel, adventure, and learning about other cultures. While many of my stateside friends might not understand this love for adventure (note their eyes glazing over as you tell them about your recent safari or hiking in the Andes), I would not trade my experiences for anything. Well…maybe until now. I DO have fears about whether I will face age discrimination, whether professional opportunities and growth will be limited, and whether I am doing the right thing for our family and young child.
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My wife, also a teacher, and I are in our early 40s. We are at a stage in our careers where we don’t plan to ‘bounce’ around the world teaching at different international or American schools every 2-3 years. We have been at our current school for over six years, but plan to recruit next year. While international teaching has become more popular and while schools have grown and multiplied, I feel there are far too many schools that are “international” or “American” in name only.
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This all leads to my never-ending reflection and stress when I weigh adventure, lifestyle, and happiness with job security, pension, and retirement. What would life would be like if we returned to the U.S. to teach? How would our international experience be perceived by potential employers in the U.S. and would it be valued? Most importantly, would we be happy and would we miss our lifestyle?
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I am living my dream NOW – touring world-famous museums, hiking in the Himalayas, relaxing on beaches in Southeast Asia, learning new languages, and seeing things the average citizen of my own country could only dream of seeing – all things I am very grateful for!  How long can this go on though and is this idea of teaching overseas a career, an adventure, or a pipe dream?
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The author of this post received a complimentary one-year ISR membership. Do YOU  have  a Blog topic you’d like to share with colleagues around the world? – Click here

Working in International Schools – a Good Career Move?

July 13, 2011

I am considering leaving a well paid 9-5 office job (in which I can also travel and work abroad) to retrain as a teacher, all with the intention of working in international schools as a career.

I was excited at the prospect until I came across the ISR web site and found extremely bad reviews for almost every school featured, usually relating to bad management, bullying of staff, corruption, poor pay and unfair dismissals.

I can assume that most people on this site are international teachers and I would therefore love to hear your opinions on the career in general. Is it a worthwhile career? Have you regretted your decision? What would you do if you were me?

Also, is it easy to find a good school or is it pot luck? Would you want to do it long term or only for a few years?

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Many thanks!